Catherine Middlecamp, The Campus as a Learning Laboratory

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The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) and the NOVA Sustainability Office are very proud to announce an event in which we see pedagogical practices in the context of civic issues & environmental sustainability.

You won’t want to miss it!

How We Learn on Campus Tells us about Life Issues in our Larger World

A case study in using the campus as a living, learning Laboratory.   

 

Middlecamp

Dr. Catherine  Middlecamp

Professor, Environmental Studies in the Nelson Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Thursday, November 21st 

Annandale Campus, CE Forum

Talk 10:30  to 11:45 AM
Workshop 1:15 to 3:15 pm  (limited to 30 participants) 

Register  for the talk using this link.

Register for the workshop using this link.

 

Dr. Middlecamp also holds a joint appointment in the Integrated Liberal Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is an affiliate faculty member of the Chemistry Department.  Her work lies at the intersection of science, people, and the planet.

As one example, Middlecamp is the editor-in-chief for Chemistry in Context, a 25-year national curriculum project of the American Chemical Society.

She has been nationally recognized for her work in many ways, including being elected a fellow of the Association for Women in Science (2003), of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2004), and of the American Chemical Society (2009). She also is a member of the National Fellowship Board of SENCER (Science Education for New Civic Responsibilities and Engagements) and in 2011 was awarded the William E. Bennett Award for Extraordinary Contributions to Citizen Science.

Dr. Middlecamp will present a morning seminar that is open to all faculty and staff,  in which she describes a course that she teaches that will show us how to expand our teaching practices into the real world of our campus and college as we learn how to use our campus as a living, learning laboratory.

This will be followed by an afternoon workshop that can accommodate thirty people.  Dr. Middlecamp will provide the how-to of engaging students in learning about the quality of their own lives on the planet.

From Dr. Middlecamp:

When it comes to learning how energy, food, water, and waste are handled on a college campus, the answers are not in the back of the book. In fact, there is no book! Even so, every campus offers its instructors an amazing number of stories about buildings, grounds, transportation, water, and the energy infrastructure. This talk tells some of these stories with an eye to how they can be used to engage students in learning about science (generally), about sustainability (more specifically) and about improving the quality of life on our planet both today and tomorrow.

Mindfulness in Teaching:  Using Meditation, Journaling and Poetry as Reflective Teaching Practices.

A Faculty Learning Community (FLC) is a small group of faculty of eight to fifteen members who engage in an active, collaborative, semester-long program with a curriculum about enhancing teaching and learning around a particular topic.  This is an opportunity to consider innovations, prepare course goals, deepen your scholarship of teaching and learning, all in collaboration with others.

Mindfulness is a way of bringing our full attention to the task at hand.  We will explore mindfulness techniques that include journaling, poetry and medication.  Mindfulness is a focus shift.  When we are focused, we concentrate better, cope better and focus on how our students perceive what we are teaching.

We will look at mindfulness techniques for teachers to use in their own lives, in the classroom and we will ask participants to create questions to be answered in future classes.  Mindfulness can help us better respond to students as a class and as individuals and many of the techniques wi will explore can be used with students.

When we are focused, we concentrate better, cope with anxiety better and learn more efficiently.  Teaching can be stressful and being a students can be stressful.  It is good to have techniques that aid learning and teaching.

This Faculty Learning Community is lead by Sherri Waas Shunfenthal and will meet on every other Wednesday from 11 AM to 1 PM.  The only real requirement for an FLC is attendance.

To register for this FLC please click here!

New Faculty Learning Community:

Diversity and Culturally Responsive Teaching

A Faculty Learning Community (FLC) is a small group of faculty of eight to fifteen members who engage in an active, collaborative, semester-long program with a curriculum about enhancing teaching and learning around a particular topic.  This is an opportunity to consider innovations, prepare course goals, deepen your scholarship of teaching and learning, all in collaboration with others.

Diversity and inclusion have a direct impact on learning.  Thus it is of paramount importance to include issues of diversity and inclusive instructional methodologies in teaching all disciplines. The purpose of this faculty learning community is to incorporate diversity, from many points of view, including  NOVA’s multi-cultural environment,  into existing or new courses and teaching curricula and implement inclusive teaching strategies. You will take away an increased appreciation of the diversity issues in higher education,  investigate  changes in your teaching practices and reflect these  in the form of your own reworked syllabi.

This community will be led by Barbara Crain, CETL Faculty Associate and Associate Professor of Geography.  The FLC will meet  on each Wednesday from 4:30 PM to 7 PM in the CETL Center on the Annandale  Campus.  The FLC will begin in late semester and meet during Fall Semester with a possibility of extending into the Spring semester.   The location may be changed depending on the wishes of the FLC once it is formed.

To register for this FLC please click here!

Welcome NOVA’s new full – time faculty!

Large Group Photo

 

The NOVA New Faculty Class of 2013-14 Kicked-off their Faculty First Year Experience on August 13th with a day-long event.   Human Resources and our benefits vendors were there in the morning with a CETL kick-off event in the afternoon!  These faculty will continue to meet with one another as they visit campuses, meet the provosts and hear invited speakers throughout their first academic year here.   Please make them welcome as you meet them!

A Great Success – Spring Speaker Series – Rethinking Learning in an Information Age

 

On 29 March 2013 the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) hosted Dr. Ike Shibley as part of the Spring Speaker Series. Dr. Shibley serves as an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Science Program Coordinator at Penn State Berks College, Pennsylvania State University System. A video of the workshop will be available on the CETL Blog.

Rethinking Learning in an Information Age, the theme of the workshop addressed how technology changes and improves (or not) student learning. Forty-four of your fellow faculty participated in this three-hour workshop. Participants in this active workshop reflected on their own teaching practices and identified better methods for helping students learn. One key discussion focused on major types of design (or redesign) for college courses (i.e., the flipped classroom). Another discussion examined multiple types of technology currently used in higher education and how participants could use/do use these technologies.

The next workshop of the 2013 Spring Speaker Series is titled S.C.A.L.E U.P. The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies and takes place on 19 April 2013 from 9:00AM – NOON at the Manassas Innovation Center. You can register here: http://www.nvcc.edu/cetl/training/.

Our guest speaker, Dr. Robert Beichner, Director of North Carolina State STEM Initiative, North Carolina State University, will discuss how changes in student backgrounds impact what happens in the classroom. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. Dr.Beichner’s SCALE-UP Project has the potential to radically change the way … classes are taught at colleges and universities. Social interaction is the active ingredient that makes the SCALE-UP approach work.

Participants will review the history of traditional lecture-hall classrooms are migrating to state-of-the-art technology-based alternatives. No technology experience required. Through hands-on activities, workshop attendees can see how to transition their current lessons to more active, technology-based instruction.

The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies

S.C.A.L.E    U.P.

The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies

April 19th: 9 AM to NOON

Manassas Innovations Center

Dr. Robert Beichner

Director of North Carolina State STEM Initiative

North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina

Register:  http://www.nvcc.edu/cetl/training/ 

   

From Dr. Beichner’s web site:

Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. We promote active learning in a redesigned classroom … [We] believe the SCALE-UP Project has the potential to radically change the way … classes are taught at colleges and universities. The social interaction between students and with their teachers appears to be the “active ingredient” that make the approach work. As more and more instruction is handled virtually via technology, the relationship-building capability of brick and mortar institutions becomes even more important. The pedagogical methods and classroom management techniques we design and disseminate are general enough to be used in a wide variety of classes at many different types of colleges.

Attendees will learn about how changes in students backgrounds should impact what happens in the classroom. They will see some of the history of lecture halls and see state-of-the-art alternatives. They will gain experience with hands-on activities and see how they can develop similar tasks for their own instruction.

Rethinking Learning in the Information Age

Rethinking Learning in an Information Age

March 29th at 9 AM to Noon

Annandale Campus, CE Forum Seminar Rooms A through D

Dr. Ike Shibley

Associate Professor of Chemistry and Science Program Coordinator

Penn State Berks College

Pennsylvania State University System

Register:  http://www.nvcc.edu/cetl/training/ 

For more information:  http://blogs.nvcc.edu/cetl/2013/02/15/leading-voices-come-to-nova-3/

   

Knowledge may have once been housed primarily in universities but the advent of technology (starting with the printing press and advancing through the Khan Academy and MOOCs) has made knowledge widely available. Learning in the 21st Century means more than being exposed to content: learning involves changing the way a person thinks. And learning can be facilitated effective deployment of technology.

Technology can be used during all three times a student can learn: before class, during class, and after class. Whether ‘class’ means face-to-face or an online lesson the concept of ‘before, during, and after’ can help educators rethink their role in the learning process.

Screencasts and other instructor-created multimedia presentations can introduce students to information before they arrive in a face-to-face classroom. The prepared learner arrives at in class (or at an interactive online session) armed with enough knowledge to work at higher cognitive levels such as application, analysis, and synthesis. The cognitive F2F activities should actively engage students so they can construct meaning about the content. The time when a student most needs the teacher is when he or she begins using knowledge to help address questions related to the course content. Technology can be employed to help students spend more time on task after class by encouraging them to complete online activities.

The pedagogical notion that students construct knowledge aligns with what is currently known about the neurobiology of learning. In this workshop we will examine some of the technology that facilitates learning outside of class such as screencasting, online quizzes, collaborative online tools, multimedia activities, and technology for students to create new learning. We will also explore the types of active learning possible in the newly liberated face-to-face time such as clickers and white boards. If you are interested in exploring ways to help students learn more using technology then this workshop is for you!

After the workshop, participants will be able to:
–reflect on their own teaching practices to identify better methods for helping students to learn
–explain the major types of design for college courses
– explain multiple types of technology being used in higher education

Want to give your courses a boost?  CETL presents:
A Faculty Focus Series on Course Design
for New and Seasoned Faculty

Register at:   http://goo.gl/2qNBg

The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning is very proud to announce the Spring 2013 Faculty Focus Series: Course Design for New and Seasoned Faculty.

Current research on undergraduate education asks us to diminish our dependence on lecture and to make our courses learning-centered. This is easier said than done, of course, and ultimately relies on the way we design our courses. The Faculty Focus series looks at how to think about course design and how to approach it, how to be sure that we really do test what we teach, and teach what we really want to test. There are many ways to assess our students’ learning, but we will focus on the construction of a valid multiple choice exam. We will also look at some ideas about how to design learning-centered activities and some strategies that allow you to move from a traditional lecture format to a student-centered environment.

You are welcome to attend one, some, or all of the sessions. We will have an additional session at the end of the series so we can get together and talk about what you learned and how you incorporated new ideas into our courses.

All sessions take place Monday from 2:30 – 4:30 PM. We will meet in the CETL Center, Annandale, CG 218. Here is the series:

Register at: http://goo.gl/2qNBg

Beginning at the End – 4 March - Cindy Miller ask whether your goals, assessments, and activities align?

Designing Valid Multiple Choice Exams – 25 March – Join Patty Ottavio and learn how to test along a cognitive process dimension from lower order to higher order thinking skills.

Creating Significant Learning Experiences – 8 April – Barbara Crain discusses how a significant learning experience helps learners learn, provides knowledge, stimulates new interests, provides thinking skills, and connects people.

Strategies for Engaging Students in the Learning Process – 22 April - Samantha Whalen helps you learn how to move from traditional lecture to a student-centered environment.

Roundtable Discussion of All Sessions – 29 April

 

 

 

Identifying & Engaging Unprepared Students: Practical Strategies & Techniques For Today’s College Classroom

On Wednesday, 13 February 2013, The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning and Pathways to the Baccalaureate hosted a webinar titled Identifying & Engaging Unprepared Students: Practical Strategies & Techniques For Today’s College Classroom. The webinar was provided by Innovative Educators and facilitated by Debra Runshe, from Indiana University. An overview of the webinar includes: Many students enter college unaware of the expectations and are unprepared for the academic rigors of college. Their initial enthusiasm and excitement is often replaced in a matter of weeks by varying degrees of discouragement. For many students, this first year of college is the “make or break” year. A national research study found that almost half of first-time students who leave their initial institutions by the end of the first year do not return to higher education. Identifying and engaging with these students is crucial to their persistence.

Major reasons for academic difficulties include 1) poor management of time, 2) continue to organization and study like still in high school, 3) poor selection/sequence of courses, and 4) always studying alone.

As you develop your courses and align activities and assessments to course outcomes ask yourself the following questions:

  • What should my students know?
  • What should they be able to do?
  • What types of activities can help students achieve the learning outcomes?
  • How will I know that they have achieved the outcomes?

Debra utilized Chickering and Gamson’s (1987) Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education to address ways to identify and engage unprepared students. The seven principles are:

  1. encourage contact between students and faculty – use communication and collaboration tools to increase and strengthen contact › do not just rely on class time or expect students to utilize office hours; create and build classroom communities
  2. develop reciprocity and cooperation among students – create collaborative rather than competitive or indepedent environments › leverage group and team activities and use peer assessments
  3. encourage active learning – in the classroom students do things and think about the things they are doing › increase retention of information to 75% by practicing and to 90% by teaching others
  4. give prompt feedback – feedback should be timely, direct, specific, and appropriate › use peer review where appropriate
  5. emphasize time on task – teach for long-term retention and life-long learning › time management skills are imperative; use a calendar
  6. communicate high expectations – boost student confidence levels by holding yourself to the same standard › share models of outstanding work; offer alternative assignments
  7. respect diverse talents and ways of learning – teach to different learning preferences that accommodate diversity › use the Felder-Silverman Model to help students discover their learning preferences

You can access Debra’s presentation here. Debra also shared an implementation guide to get you started. The link to the recorded webinar is here. Click on Debra’s picture to send her an email.