Installations abound

Installations have appeared all over the Fine Arts building from students in Art 132, Fundamentals of Design 2 and Art 236 –  Sculptural Ceramics.

“Withering Enchantment, by Sata Seck 3-D object, stones and paint. Outside the AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design 2 with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Power in Motion, by Samira Borghei 3-D printed object, CDs, Paint. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Power in Motion, by Samira Borghei 3-D printed object, CDs, Paint. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley

 

“Power in Motion, by Samira Borghei 3-D printed object, CDs, Paint. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Power in Motion, by Samira Borghei 3-D printed object, CDs, Paint. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Cup with Megaphone Amplifier, by Tyler Farbes 3-D. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley

They are fun and engaging.

“Cup with Megaphone Amplifier, by Tyler Farbes 3-D. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Pablo’s Muse, by Nathan Johnson. Inside AFA building. For ART-236 Sculptural Ceramics with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Rebellion, by Hannah Marshal. Acrylic paint, 3-D printed object, chicken wire, rope, suction cups, zip ties, fishing line. Inside on the first floor of the AFA building. For ART-199 Independent Study with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Withering Enchantment, by Sata Seck 3-D object, stones and paint. Outside the AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design 2 with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Withering Enchantment, by Sata Seck 3-D object, stones and paint. Outside the AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design 2 with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Withering Enchantment, by Sata Seck 3-D object, stones and paint. Outside the AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design 2 with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Behind the Mask, by Andrew Green. Inside AFA building. For ART-236 Sculptural Ceramics with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Behind the Mask, by Andrew Green. Inside AFA building. For ART-236 Sculptural Ceramics with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Campaign, by Khalil Brooker 3-D printed object. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Campaign, by Khalil Brooker 3-D printed object. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Campaign, by Khalil Brooker 3-D printed object. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Campaign, by Khalil Brooker 3-D printed object. 3rd floor AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Distorted Mokery, by Mohamed Elhaddad Manikin, sound, paint, 3D object. Outside the AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley

The best part of this is the red button on the telephone!  Press it to hear audio…

“Distorted Mokery, by Mohamed Elhaddad Manikin, sound, paint, 3D object. Outside the AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“Distorted Mokery, by Mohamed Elhaddad Manikin, sound, paint, 3D object. Outside the AFA building. For ART-132 Fundamentals of Design with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“The Disappeared, by Jennifer Cohen 3-D. 1st floor AFA building. For ART-236 Sculptural Ceramics with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
“The Disappeared, by Jennifer Cohen 3-D. 1st floor AFA building. For ART-236 Sculptural Ceramics with professor Jessica Gardner. Exhibition on view from 4/30-5/7 2018. Photo by Britt Conley
Neighbors by Christopher Tait. Plastic Ants, 3-D printed object, local soil. Photo by Britt Conley
Neighbors by Christopher Tait. Plastic Ants, 3-D printed object, local soil. Photo by Britt Conley
Neighbors by Christopher Tait. Plastic Ants, 3-D printed object, local soil. Photo by Britt Conley
Neighbors by Christopher Tait. Plastic Ants, 3-D printed object, local soil. Photo by Britt Conley
Sickeningly Sweet by Sharon Stewart. 3-D printed object, ready-made Toothbrushes, Serving Trays and Multi-colored Sprinkles. For ART 132 Fundamentals of Design. Photo by Britt Conley
Sickeningly Sweet by Sharon Stewart. 3-D printed object, ready-made Toothbrushes, Serving Trays and Multi-colored Sprinkles. For ART 132 Fundamentals of Design. Photo by Britt Conley
Sickeningly Sweet by Sharon Stewart. 3-D printed object, ready-made Toothbrushes, Serving Trays and Multi-colored Sprinkles. For ART 132 Fundamentals of Design. Photo by Britt Conley
Escape from Reality by Michelle Cruz. 3-D printed object, cotton balls, paint, miniature trees, streamer, paper, clay, tie wire, canvas. For art 132, Fundamentals of Design. Photo by Britt Conley.
Escape from Reality by Michelle Cruz. 3-D printed object, cotton balls, paint, miniature trees, streamer, paper, clay, tie wire, canvas. For art 132, Fundamentals of Design. Photo by Britt Conley.
Shattered Visions by Sarah Ray. Art 132 – Fundamentals of Design. Photo by Britt Conley
Shattered Visions by Sarah Ray. Art 132 – Fundamentals of Design. Photo by Britt Conley
Shattered Visions by Sarah Ray. Art 132 – Fundamentals of Design. Photo by Britt Conley
Shattered Visions by Sarah Ray. Art 132 – Fundamentals of Design. Photo by Britt Conley
Jessica Gardner with her ART 132  – Fundamentals of Design Class. Photo by Britt Conley

See those of you taking classes this summer, after the break!

Blog post by Britt Conley, Studio Assistant to the Fine Art Department.

2018 Student Fine Art Show

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

We all had a great time.   The turn-out was wonderful! Art lovers poured in throughout the evening to celebrate our student’s work, free food and be a part of our awards ceremony.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Each year, after everyone works hard creating all of this wonderful work,  they are reminded to invite friends and family.   Afterall, this is often their first show.  Family support and pride, is always a joy to see : )

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

And friends celebrating one another is also the best : )

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

We were thrilled to see our Provost, Dr. Haggray : )

Stacy Slaten and Dr. Haggray.  The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

She has attended all of our shows, since she took office here, and is an avid appreciator of everyone’s works.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Dr. McClellan, our Alexandria Dean of Liberal Arts is a long-time  supporter of our art program, students and department events.  He’s come to nearly every show for so long that I presume, that  ‘decades’ would be the appropriate time frame descriptor.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Our two jurors were Nikki Brugnoli and Jon McMillan.

She has come to all of our shows so far and is an art lover.

Nikki Brugnoli, our 2D Juror, is the Assistant Graduate Programs Coordinator, at George Mason University.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Our 3-d juror this year, Jon McMillan, is the Assistant Professor of Ceramics at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

They not only determined this year’s award winners, they were kind enough to come and hand out the award certificates.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

The best part of the show is watching the surprise on our students faces.  They work so hard all year and rewarding them is inspiring.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

After the list of honorable mentions, which included:

Sophia Woolston, D’Arcy Dean, Allen Beland, Daniel Rivas, Nala Ktzleb, Nora Drake, Mohamed El-Haddad, Lyle Priddy and Wesley Walker, we had our 3rd place prize, which went to Ireen Clayton-Jones for her piece “Nyquil Haze”

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Our second place prize went to Christopher Tait, for his “Artifacts”

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

With our first place award going to Miyuki Matsuoka.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Her ‘Warriors’ made out of clay,  were thoughtfully conceived and wonderfully executed.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

After the wards ceremony, there was plenty of time to enjoy the art and celebrate one another.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Mohamed Elhaddad won an honorable mention for his photo and string work.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

A beautiful painting always brings great pride.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Stacy Slaten is so proud of her students!

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

It’s a great show as always and we can’t wait to see what the students produce next year!

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt ConleyShe has come to all of our shows so far and is an art lover.
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

So much Art to take in.  Hopefully everyone is inspiring the next art maker.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Pete Van Riper, our advanced drawing teacher, was thrilled to see the works, and our Dean, Dr. McClellan and Jessica Gardner were loving the entire reception.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

The faculty are always big fans of everyone’s work.  Stacy and Jessica did a great job getting their students involved and working on the show.

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

Supportive friends are the best!

The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley
The 2018 Student Fine Art Show reception at the Center for Design Media and the Arts on Monday, April 16th from 5:30-7:30. Photo by Britt Conley

The show will be up until May 4th, 2018!  Come on over to see the art, the new building and perhaps say hello to us, at the new Fine Arts Office, in room 342.

Post by: Britt Conley,  Fine Art Department Studio Assistant

 

Crowns! A touring art exhibition with our own Jessica Gardner

Crowns was proposed as an exhibit examines the transition that occurs while “crossing into motherhood,” as a “monumental shift in a woman’s life” The exhibit not only addresses how women’s roles shift when they become mothers, but also who they are as women and artists.  The role on motherhood can be all encompassing and does not come with an easy path for most.   As artists, the eight women visually reflect, “on their experiences in the currents of motherhood.”

Crowns at Ann Arundel Community College

The “Crowns” tour is being spearheaded by NOVA’s own, ceramics faculty, Jessica Gardner.  She has been driving around setting up and striking each show at every new location.  The show began it’s first showing at the Ann Arundel Community College’s Gade Gallery from January-February before traveling to  exhibit with the National Council on Education of Ceramics Arts (NCECA) conference which were on display at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh – Homewood, where is was on display in March.  It’s next stop opens on April 3rd at the Foster Art Gallery at Westiminster College, in New Wilmington, PA.  The show goes through August 3rd.  From August-October the show will arrived back in the area at the New Gallery for Contempoary Craft at NOVA’s Woodbridge Campus.  After that the show travels to the DuPont Gallery at the University of Mary Washington, in Fredericksburg, VA from October 25th-December 2nd.  After that it’s off to NOVA’s Manassas campus.  There is bound to be more additions to the list before the exhibit gets to The Canton Museum of Art in Canton Ohio from November of 2019- March 2020.

Jessica is not only the organizer of this grand tour, she is also one of the artists.  Jessica explains her art, “has traditionally been a subtle reflection of the introspective nature and self-assessment that form the pillars of my personality…and then I had children.

Crowns at Ann Arundel Community College  Photo by Bikki Stryker

Suddenly, my tendency toward diplomacy in life and in my art gave way to exhaustion and turmoil. This body of work reflects the simultaneous elation and emotional erosion that coalesced into my experience of motherhood in modernity.”

The other seven artist’s include:

Stephanie DeArmond, who’s work, “explores language, taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of over heard conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form, where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letter forms.”  Her description is clearly evident in her teapot, shown below.  He adds, “In this way, it memorializes everyday language in a larger-than-life forms, functioning like signage, oversized tchotckes, or the doodles in a notebook.”

Butterfly Teapot by DeArmond Stephanie.

The third artist, Carole Epp, states,  “Since beginning, this body of work,” (originally) from 2005, “…has evolved in different ways, both thematically and visually. The impact of having my own children and working with imagery of children and childhood has propelled the work into a more personal realm wherein issues of motherhood, identity, and child-rearing have become part of the larger discussion of the work. My aim with this work has always been to find a space of dialogue for issues of political and social relevance; to tap into the humanity behind the headlines, to address concerns we face in day to day life, and to create an active desire for change in our world. “

She nurtured both growth and decay by Carol Epp

Janis Mars Wunderlich’s work, “expresses the complexities of intimate relationships in traversing the trials and triumphs of our human experience.  As we grow and mature,” she expounds, “we gain awareness of our sexuality, passions, instincts, and desires to form intimate associations in our transition from childhood into the role of adult and nurturer.  Through this growth our weaknesses, dependencies and vulnerabilities are revealed, and our experiences and relationships transform us as we gain maturity, charity, wisdom, and strength.”

Die mutter by Janis Mars Wunderlich

Kate Fisher thinks of her art as, “as domestic art: it is either for or about the home.  I make work to be used in daily life or to reference utilitarian objects. The kitchen, in particular, is a home’s command central, where we congregate, nourish ourselves, and share our histories and culinary traditions. My mentors instilled in me the importance of creating a domestic environment that enhances personal research and understanding of clay and self. By using, washing, touching, and serving others and myself from handmade objects, I complete the circle of craft. This practice continually informs the work I make and the work I won’t make.”

How Many OZ? by Kate Fisher

Summer Zickefoose, describes her work as addressing, “the middle of nowhere; observed from an interstate. The sticks, the hicks, the mind-numbing boredom. The absence of culture, of progress, of significance. The rural American landscape is often the setting both literally and figuratively for my investigations as an artist. This landscape is representative of its human counterparts and their codes of language, ethics, traditions, and behavioral traits. As with any archaeology, there is the place, its culture, and the objects and

Bone Dust Scraper by Summer Zickefoose

materials used by that culture. I believe that these objects and materials hold within them a multitude of secrets.”

Rhonda Willers ponders experience.  “A poetic power manifests itself in silence.  Strength and subtlety intertwine during our encounters with the contemplative. Using these deafeningly subdued experiences, I explore metaphoric and physical relationships with my ceramic vessels, drawings and mixed media works that allude to sacred rituals.”

Rest by Rhonda Willers

The final artist,  Eva Kwong, says, she searches,  “for the interconnections between things in the world, similarities as well as the differences.  I am interested in the concept of one in many and the many in one.  My hybrid art forms are influenced by my observations of the natural world and what I experience in my life.”

Artwork by Eva Kwong and Janis Mars Wunderlich.  Photo by Sean McCormick
Crowns exhibit. Photo by Sean McCormick

For more information on Crowns, contact Jessica Gardener at JGGardner@nvcc.edu

Post by: Britt Conley,  Fine Art Department Studio Assistant

Artist Regina Miele visits Stacy Slaten’s Painting Class

Washington area landscape artist, Regina Miele was kind enough to come visit us on Tuesday, March 27th.

“Edge Creek” by Regina Miele.

Regina discussed her art and what moves her to paint as well as her artistic career.  On her site, she explains her focus on the importance of light, not being just a value tool.  She’s, “attracted to times of day that express change…”

“Studio 3pm” by Regina Miele.

Her portraits, she adds, “attempt to capture someone expressing their humanity.”

Regina also spent time working with our students with in depth critiques and demos to help them learn more about color and more effective ways of color mixing that would enhance their creative process.

Regina Miele working with our student. Photo by Britt Conley

Regina’s portraits are all about mood and drawing out the character of the person or the moment.

“Basquiat” by Regina Miele.

She was able to show our students tips and techniques with checking the painterly drawings, and being more efficient with placement and proportion.

Regina Miele working with students in our Painting class. Photo by Britt Conley

The student’s loved having the opportunity to have a professional see their work and advise them on their create endeavors.

It’s was a great couple of hours and a win, win, for everyone!

To see more of Regina’s work visit http://www.reginamiele.com

“Blue Bedroom” by Regina Miele.

Post by: Britt Conley,  Fine Art Department Studio Assistant

 

 

Students working toward November Empty Bowls donation!

The students are working hard on creating their bowls for the project. Photo by Britt Conley

Each year, our ceramics instructor, Jessica Gardner, works with her students to make over a 100 bowls for the Empty Bowls, Alexandria  community project fundraiser.

Jessica Gardener working with students. Photo by Britt Conley

The bowls are first thrown… created on the wheel and then they are trimmed to shape.

Students are working hard. Photo by Britt Conley

Empty Bowls is a national program that works with artists at the community level, to raise awareness for hunger in area communities.

What a great form! Always impressed with what the students come up with. Photo by Britt Conley

Last year the students at Alexandria campus donated more than 100 bowls toward the community fundraising efforts.

2017 Empty Bowls donations from NOVA students

Working on the wheel is one thing.. but working for the community while creating is far more rewarding.

A lot of work goes into each bowl. Photo by Britt Conley
It really is a great learning experience for the students. Photo by Britt Conley

 

Photo by Britt Conley

For more information about this year’s November, Empty Bowls fundraiser, with work from our NOVA students, contact Jessica Gardner at JGgardner@nvcc.edu

Student work. Photo by Britt Conley

Post by: Britt Conley,  Fine Art Department Studio Assistant

Holiday NOVA Art’s Ceramics Sale!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

The Annual NOVA Ceramics Pottery Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Center for the Arts.

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

We all had such a great time!  Everyone set up beautifully!  Jessica did an amazing job helping everyone out!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Bikki Stricker

Each year we enjoy selling works from our talented students in our ceramic program.

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

It gives everyone the opportunity to learn how to set up shop and sell!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

Fortunately, We have lots of ceramics to choose from!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

And everyone loves the opportunity to give handmade gifts!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

Some of the works are just lovely!  I personally love the teapots!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

Even bowls come in all shapes, sizes and colors!!!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley
December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

I loved these blue bowls with matching plates!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

Everyone was excited to help bring in the Christmas cheer!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

A great time was had by ALL!!!!!

December 9th, 2017 The Annual Ceramics Show at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center. Photo by Britt Conley

For more information about next year’s Ceramic sale, contact Jessica Gardner at JgGardner@nvcc.edu

Hope to see you then!

Post by: Britt Conley,  Fine Art Department Studio Assistant

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding

Our first fine art department show in the new Center for Design, Media and the Arts building here at the Alexandria Campus!

Each year we dedicate one show to a topic theme for an outside artistic group or singular artist to broaden the minds of our students and show them what serious shows can be.  This year we collaborated with George Mason’s graduate MFA program.  The artists within the masters program determined their theme.

The artwork is brilliantly constructed.  Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding serves. “as a reflection on accumulations of  moments of recognition after a catastrophic event.”  The artists used themes of, “shelter, repair, reconstruction, self-reliance, collectivism, exchange, organizing, technology and functionality,” to communicate the temporary paradigms that experienced by those touched by catastrophic events.

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Canopy by Kate Fitzpatrick and Kerry Hentges. Photo by Britt Conley

The work, “Canopy,” is created from cut canvas, grommets, red thread and pine.

Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

Kate Fitzpatrick and Kerry Hentges built “Canopy,” to reflect the protection, and shielding from the outside elements that is necessary with makeshift shelters.  They explain, “Although these kinds of shelters are temporary and made with found items that come apart or lose strength, people are linked and reconnected through the process of rebuilding.”

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Canopy by Kate Fitzpatrick and Kerry Hentges. Photo by Britt Conley

 

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding, Refuge: Under it’s Own Weight by Erica Hopkins and Emily Fussner. Photo by Britt Conley

One of the unexpected works, is the installation by Emily Fussner and Erica Hopkins, which consists of dipped wire in flax paper pulp.

Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

“Refuge: Under its Own Weight”  traverses our building structure.  The majority of the work resides in the main gallery room, however small trails of wire rest outside the gallery wall, holding up to the outdoor weather elements.

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding, Refuge: Under it’s Own Weight by Erica Hopkins and Emily Fussner. Photo by Britt Conley

The next, they explain, “is on of the most basic shelters: a primitive refuge at once secure and delicate.  It is a sanctuary, made from available materials with care by the dweller.”

On the gallery north wall, resides “Inverted Rank: Shifting Gear” by Jennifer Lillis and Giacomo Gamble.  The used found bicycles to show how bicycling is used, “as a primary mode of transportation.  Often times after catastrophe, systems of communication and transportation  are broken down, causing shifts in social power,” they continue, ” By breaking bicycles down  to their base components, we manipulate the function of it’s mobility to inverse the power in a capitalist society to knowledge base in archaic structures.”

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding, Inverted Rank by Jennifer Lillis and Giacomo Gamble. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

Just seeing the individual parts of the bicycles makes one aware of the difficulties of rebuilding.

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding, Inverted Rank by Jennifer Lillis and Giacomo Gamble. Photo by Britt Conley

The lone tire, splattered with mud seemingly illustrates, the distances that one must traverse when transportation breaks down.

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding, Inverted Rank by Jennifer Lillis and Giacomo Gamble. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

Kerry Hentges has altered books to explore the “personal items and family heirlooms,” that are lost in disasters.   “A circular patters is cut int he center of the book,” she explains, “causing ti to lose all meaning and functional purpose.  The layered cuts mimic the weather pattern at the center of the large storm, known as the stadium effect.”

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding, What Remains by Kerry Hentges. Photo by Britt Conley
Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding, What Remains by Kerry Hentges. Photo by Britt Conley

Finally Brigitte Caramanna created “The Universal Power Paradox” to show how, “Power is becoming vital to our existence.”  She illustrates how this vulnerability leaves us, “at the mercy of our planet supporting us.”

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding, The Ultimate Power of Paradox by Brigitte Caramanna. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

Brigitte adds, these etchings show, “Our rise or demise,” as, “determined by the way we use our resources.”

Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding, The Ultimate Power of Paradox by Brigitte Caramanna. Photo by Britt Conley

The opening for the show, was great.  It wasn’t long before everyone began arriving for the “Aftermath” opening reception at 4pm on November 7th.

Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

Everyone excitedly prepped for a lovely early evening gathering.

Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

The installations were a hit!

Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

The raining day, made for a lovely backdrop.  It was all about the art.

Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

One of the great new features of our gallery is the TV screen.  Perfect to showcase the artists biography and artist statements.

Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

The show was curated by our very Jessica Gardner.  She is our ceramics faculty and an artist in her own right.

Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Emily Fussner stands within her installation. Photo by Britt Conley

The installations perfectly used the space at hand.  Our new gallery walls are still en route.  The artists problem-solved beautifully.

Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley
Opening Night of Aftermath: Cycles of Rebuilding. Photo by Britt Conley

If you haven’t seen the show, please do come in.  It runs until December 17th, 2017.

For more information about the show, contact Jessica Gardner at JgGardner@nvcc.edu

Post by: Britt Conley,  Fine Art Department Studio Assistant

 

 

 

Fall 2017 Art Class Happenings

It’s a lot more fun for students to work with perspective in our new Fine Arts Building. Photo By Britt Conley

Samantha Sethi, one of our drawing teachers, has been sending her students around the building to work on their perspective assignments.

Photo by Britt Conley

Capturing the space of the world around us is not an easy task.

Photo By Britt Conley

The students never fail to surprise us.

Photo by Britt Conley

Without a doubt, it’s one of the more difficult assignments.

Photo by Britt Conley

But everyone is always ready, with ruler in hand.

Photo by Britt Conley

I’m always amazed with everyone’s skill.

Post by: Britt Conley,  Fine Art Department Studio Assistant

We’ve Arrived in the new Building

We have finally left the old Tyler Building and moved up into our brand new Center for Design, Media and the Arts Building,  just up the hill at the Alexandria Campus.  It’s right across from the Bisdorf Building.  There are also two sets of elevators and handicap parking is right outside the building.  All in all it’s really been wonderfully designed.

Center for Design, Media and the Arts. Photo courtesty of Northern Virgina Community College

The inside is just as nice the exterior.  It houses the Music, Art, Photo, Graphic Design, Theater, Communications, Physical Education and Early Childhood Development Departments.

The entry foyer of The Center for Design, Media and the Arts at Alexandria Campus. Photo by Britt Conley

The Arts Department, Graphic Design and Photography are all on the third floor.  Ceramics, Theater, Music  and PE, reside on first and second floors.

Our new Barnes & Noble bookstore houses a Starbucks! Photo by Britt Conley

We now have a brand new Barns&Noble Bookstore, which houses its own Starbucks!  They offer all the regular drink and food options that used to be a car ride away.   They  also offer numerous healthy food options as well as snacks.

Photo by Britt Conley

Our new Art Department has stunning new classrooms.  Our drawing and painting studios offer phenomenal lighting between the northern window light, tall ceilings and track lighting!

Photo by Britt Conley

The painting studio is just as spacious and also offers a full computer teaching area for presentations.

The new Ceramics studio is next to the bookstore on the first floor.  The students are loving it .

Photo by Britt Conley

The shelves are already filling up!

Photo by Britt Conle

Long gone are the old, drab, Tyler hallways.  Our new building walkways, offer TV screens and bulletin boards to grab information on the go.  They also offer seating and easy access to great views and even a soda machine right there in the department on the second floor.  Want to relax in between classes?  There are plenty of places to grab a seat and plug right into any of the tables or walls nearby.

The 1st floor, Music Department hallway at The Center for Design, Media and the Arts. Photo by Britt Conley

Each floor offers seating and great views.

Second Floor Seating. Photo by Britt Conley

The music department offers new Steinways!

All of our teaching studios and practice rooms have pianos. Photo by Britt Conley

The gym is available to students during set hours.  Stop by to see their schedule!

 

The Workout Center at The Center for Design, Media and the Arts. Photo by Britt Conley

Stop by the other departments and take a tour!  It’s worth visit!

Post by: Britt Conley,  Fine Art Department Studio Assistant