NEW WORLD TO EXPLORE AND TO DISCOVER

Have you ever imagined how it feels for agent J (starred by Will Smith) – a secret agent movie Man in Black (MIB), when he entered the intergalactic secret agent station of MIB? The station is filled with unusual creatures and aliens from far away galaxies and distant planet throughout the universe. Traveling around 10,000 miles equal to 15,000 kilometers from Indonesia to America, upon my arrival as an “alien” for the first time in United States, all that was reviving in my mind was the scene of Agent J in the fore mentioned movie. It was a long and snaking queue full of various strangers at the Los Angeles international airport which was super crowded. The queue was caused by the computer system of the Los Angeles international airport that went down at the recent time. I witnessed a diverse group of people from different countries and ethnics. It was breathtakingly astonishing and I was overwhelmed with amusement. Finally, I officially arrived in United States, the country of immigrants.

From my observation, I noticed Koreans, Japans, Europeans, Hawaiians, Mid-Eastern people, Africans, Americans, children, gentlemen, ladies and so on, so forth. There was a kid, ignoring the summer-heated circumstance, rode on her pinky baggage along the line back and forth as if she was riding her favorite bicycle and did not belong to any queue. There was a couple who remained their scuba-diving costume rolled down from the upper body to the waist leaving a piece of grey T-shirt on their top. They did enjoy their line up by holding hand. I assumed they were from a vacation in Hawaii. Another guy in-line that I believed from Japan was still in gentle and neat black suit after his flight. Seemingly after escaping from the queue, he would directly join a very important business meeting. Mostly I could assume the nationality of the individual by their physical features and by also identifying their language.

Flown with American Airlines touching down Los Angeles Airport by July 14th, It was around 3 pm in the summer. Despite the long entry line, I enjoyed the thrilling view and I was full of excitement. Observing them was like reading global population map book. Inspired by that weird, yet impressive moment, I started to think about the diverse individuals that I was going to meet on campus, apartment, and environment.

I can deliberately claim that I am one of the luckiest persons on earth to have this precious chance to visit United States through CCI Program funded by The State Department amid the new the US immigrant policy of banning Muslims in regards with my name being typical Islamic name with ‘Muhammad’. After all I conclude that ‘typical name issue’ is just an assumption that I was proven wrong. Everything was going as smooth as my thirty-hour trip from Indonesia to the USA. I can confirm that as long as we have cleared our background and have willingness to study, all of us will find our way out. We just need to devote a bit more courage and effort. Besides, US government has deep concern on global education. In addition to it, prayer is a must-need.

***

As an international student who will stay in this country full of dream, I must get settled in as quickly as possible in order to begin what I have been dreaming for years, the journey of America. On the process, there are lots of new things I have found in regards with individual, groups of people, local community, and varied things which are either impressive or unexpected. And of course, there are hidden gems in many spots in my living environment. This writing will tell some few concepts and points that examine how I, a new international student, have dealt with my first impressions, culture shocks, and various adaptation processes so far.

GAINING MENTAL AND PHYSICAL READINESS

There are many challenges to encounter in the early stay in a new living place, not to mention in United States which can be very difficult. The most important thing is, as human being naturally equipped with adaptation ability, we are expected to always be mentally and physically prepared for any condition, this unique human attribute prevents us from complaining and keeps us moving.

For instance, my first day in Alexandria city of Virginia, The City of Lovers, was quite hard considering my 30-hour-flight exhaustion and I almost ruined my sleeping pattern – at least it was what my coordinator told me. After arriving in the morning at Dulles Airport, I unintentionally fell into sleep at 4 pm to 9 pm in my first night local time. I might still have my Indonesia sleeping hours which 12 hours ahead of America, I thought to myself.

Instead of being anxious on jetlag, I got myself out of the house and walked down the street near the house until 2 am. Not only that I could exhaust myself so that I can fall asleep and keep me in US sleeping hours, but also I could enjoy beautiful sightseeing to my surroundings in my first night in the city of Alexandria. Recently Virginia is glowing under Summer sunshine, so stay hydrated!

HOLDING THE SPIRIT OF TRAVELING

A traveler always believes, God spreads pieces of His beautiful paradise over somewhere around in this earth. Like treasure, one just needs to take a first step to discover it. That is what I strongly believe. The first day I arrived, I could not ground my feet remain on the floor of my apartment. I just wanted to go out and explore. One hour being inside the house upon my arrival was enough. All that was in my mind was to have a date with the beautiful Virginia.

The first day, with clueless mind, I took courage to step out of the residence. It led me to see how beautiful the trees standing neatly side by side around my house were, with their pink colorful blossoms. Some were yellow and pale green. It felt like spring, yet It was summer, but I then remembered, my program coordinator said we would be able to see colorful leaves in the fall next season. If flowers were this beautiful in summer, I just wonder how they will be in the fall season.

SCHEMATIZING FUTURE

In order to have a sustainably well-managed life for an international student in the US, I quote Benjamin Franklin words stating, “failing to prepare is preparing to fail.” It was a big clue for me before the departure to my US study. Thus, the first day by being informed by Kelly Forbes, my program coordinator, I noticed some information. Therefore, I had been able to schematize all needs and prospects of my one year stay here. It is not only about budgeting, but also learning facilities at home like books or even accessible libraries or any other comfortable spots to read books. In addition to that, planning our study will be as essential as planning dietary. Both are reciprocally supportive each other.

I want to make special discussion about money. If you come from developing country like Indonesia, you might find banking system in US is more sophisticated. Bank provides abundant online service that makes everything reliably easy. Most of transactions at shops require debit or credit swipe card service; cash transaction is likely extinct. Yet the sophistication does not mean perfection. I have to always keep my password and some confidential codes. No one should know, not even the bankers. Only God and I know.

MEETING THE LOCALS

Based on books and discussion with friends in my home country, Americans are individually-oriented community. I have made up my mind in deep contemplation after experiencing my first two weeks here. It turns out people here are easy to get along, at least in the town I’m living. Every time I visit a restaurant or get on the bus, I frequently find occasion the officers will certainly say, “Hi, how are you?”, “How are you doing?”, “have a nice day” or simply “good day”. The first time, I did not respond anything, just simply because I was too much wowed to see people were very warm to greet each other. The last time from hanging out with my roommate when passing the street, a mother inside her stopped car waved her hand to us with her smile. Anyhow, again I feel so welcome in this country.

I also want to share that some friends and I were very lucky to visit Timothy’s house. We were introduced by Sunny, a very kind Pakistani brother who studied at Northern Virginia Community College, where all participants are studying. When we visited, Tim and her wife Terry were holding ice cream party. He was visited by friends from many cities too, like His friend Shibu from Philadelphia and her wife. The house was so crowded with other cheerful people who kept coming and had their enjoyable conversation. We did enjoy our discussion resembling like family chitchat. I was thrilled on the very comfortable conversation. I also had a chance eying and touching the house antique properties like the unused chimney, old photos, old gramophone, Timothy’s veteran hat, pendulum watch, etc. Poured under summer rainfall, the house was felt very warm inside with the family togetherness and friendship. He said, we have much time ahead to savor togetherness next time.

MANIFESTING THE MIRACLE OF ASKING QUESTION

Frequently I felt shame or hesitated when I asked questions in a formal forum. Yet I started to realize that it is the way I can experimentally learn something new or fulfill my curiosity when asking. I believe curiosity is a philosophical behavior and a part of human nature that has rights to fulfill. Other than that, question is a part of the nature of journalism, the major I will proceed here. By any means, as long as I need, I will try to arrange my words to create strategical questions or investigative ones.

As a part of traveler’s value, question is how God gives clues to human who is cluelessly in need. To reinforce the concept, let me throw in quote saying, “No one is dumb who is curious. The people who don’t ask questions remain clueless throughout their lives.”

The writer, Rudolph, Patrick, and Pace Irics are having Mid-East dish for their lunch together under a shading Saturday tree after scavenger hunting at DC. They have been through many cultural differences in the last four weeks, including the different behavior of sitting on the ground.

LOVING LIVING WITH CCI FAMILY

CCI Program of Virginia bringing 12 country representatives is such a big family. Even though Everyone carries diverse life values and characters and just met, we are living under the same roof. Connecting everyone is so challenging for the early adaptation. In my apartment where I share house with brothers from Africa and Brazil, we are still getting over the difference. However, I do enjoy every talk and discussion while building understanding with everyone. I am strongly convinced this is a beginning I build a brand new, global family that I can tell people in my community back home in the future. Every meeting with them will be a precious story long-lasting in my memory. This first few weeks will be an eyewitness how a new melting-pot family is born in the land of colonial Virginia, USA.

***

There is no the best way for everyone, everyone fits one. In the other words, everyone has their own unique way to overcome the so-called culture shock or carry on adaptation process in a new area of living. This article just covered only one piece among thousands even millions of adaptation ways. What a person needs to settle in is to keep moving on and not left behind, unless he or she wants to get extinct like dinosaurs did.

All in all, our program coordinator once explained about the stages of cultural shock international students normally experience in US; honey moon stage; frustration stage; adjustment stage; and acceptance stage. This far I felt like I am overwhelmingly positive and become infatuated with the language, people, emotions and feelings in my new surroundings. As I project the prospect of my learning routines a year ahead here, I’m afraid if I cannot move on from the first level of culture shock; the honey moon stage.

Post written by Muhammad Arham, 2017-2018 participant at NOVA-Annandale from Indonesia

I am Ayesha Alam from Bangladesh

I am Ayesha Alam from Bangladesh.  A lot of things were poking in my head about studying in Virginia. It was almost night when I arrived in Washington D.C.  We got a very warm welcome because our coordinator were waiting for us. The weather was good but still I was feeling very cold. We made our way to the apartment.

At first I was very scared of my apartment mates.  I was much confused about how I can cope up with them, will they ever accept me because I didn’t share my room with anyone before. But when I met them, I was really surprised seeing them very friendly and cooperative. Next day, we had a introductory session with all other students at the pool. And there’s nothing to compare with that moment. Even though I was scared a lot, but everyone appreciate me. They all were very humble, kind, helpful. So it made me more comfortable. We become a new family in Virginia with full of diversity.

My first day at NOVA was also unforgettable. All the students and teacher wanted to know my culture, tradition and customs. The teacher is also very supportive. I made so many friends at once and mingle with so many people from different background. It helped me a lot to develop relationships and mutual understanding with people around the world.

Community College Initiative (CCI) Program has increased my level so high. It teaches me to gain a global sense of citizenship. Everyday I am coming out of my comfort zone and learning something new from everyone. Americans are very punctual, discipline, open mindness. So, the life here is amazing. I am really grateful to the American Government, American people and everyone for making a new family member irrespective of my background only within weeks in U.S.A.

Post written by Ayesha Alam, 2017-2018 participant at NOVA-Annandale from Bangladesh

Stepping out of the Comfort Zone

Hi, my name is Alisson, I’m 22 years old and I’m from Brazil. When I arrived in the Washington’s airport and saw Sara, I felt that the CCI PROGRAM would be a great program.  Her smile was so friendly and lovely what makes me forget that I am in a new country with a new culture and new rules.

In the first week, I met the others students, from Ghana, from India, Indonesia, Turkey and different countries that I couldn’t never imagine. They make me feel in my home. About the comfort zone? Everyday I learn more about the English and the world. I’m not so good with English but my new friends help me and give me support to feel more confident.

 

I’m getting out from my comfort zone and there’s others many students in the same situation, living with the “new” in each hour that we spend in the USA. We are in the same boat,  but we aren’t alone. About the CCI PROGRAM STAFF? Amazing people that I admire and respect, they love what they do. Kelly, Kate and Leeza give us all support that we need and they are always with a smile in their faces, so for the great and wonderful staff: thank you so much for believing in us all. This is just the beginning of this long journey!!

Post written by Francisco Alisson Medeiros Da Silveira, 2017-2018 participant at NOVA-Annandale, from Brazil

The Taste of America in First Two Weeks

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” –Eleanor Roosevelt

I remember, when I was in elementary school, I wrote many things in my Hello Kitty diary; about my favorite things, about my first shoes that I bought from my savings, also about my dreams. I did not know why in that time, I wrote that I really want to go abroad someday, and I wrote “I will go to America”.

Until I graduated from the university, I always looking for many opportunities to go abroad. One day, I tried my best to apply the CCI Program, that brought me to The United State now. Sometimes, I feel that it just like a dream. Many people said that I am lucky, but I don’t think so. I got this scholarship because of my effort, because I did my best until now.

Time flies. From sending the application, did the interview, orientation, until departure to the US, and now I have been in the US for two weeks. It’s not a very long time, but still, I learn many new things here. I mingle with many people, include my CCI friend from another country, some of American people, and taste many new things and new environment. I am so happy about those things. I feel like everything is going well. I eat well, sleep well, have a lot of fun, and earn something new in my school, Northern Virginia Community College.

From the orientation, my coordinator said that maybe all of us in the “honeymoon stage” right now, where everything seems good and exciting. It means that maybe in a couple of weeks ahead, we will face some culture shocks. I agree with that, but I hope that I will never experience the worse one. One of my biggest concern is missing my family in Indonesia, but thank God, we have so many options to keep in touch with our family through technology.

From my first two weeks in America, I learn a lot of things. First, prior my departure to this country, I thought that American people are arrogant, they hate Moslem people, they never smile, and all stereotyping things. Until I got here, I was totally wrong. Most of Americans are so friendly and helpful. They love to smile, and they say sorry and thank you in the easiest way. I mean, Indonesian people said that they are the friendliest people in the whole world, but they don’t do things like Americans. I can find many Indonesian people rarely say sorry when they did something wrong, also rarely say thank you to someone else. In America, they say those words easily.

The other thing that I found very interesting is, people in America are so on time. They appreciate time so much. Last week, when I arrived in my English class in the early morning, and I was the first one in the class, my professor said thank you to me for several times. I was so happy, because in Indonesia, when I arrived in a meeting point on time, no one cares. Also, when someone is coming late, no one cares.

But, not all the things are going well in this two weeks. I also feel somehow awkward with the situation here. The first thing that I feel it’s quite disgusting is I keep convert US dollar to my currency, and it drives me crazy. For example, when I bought spinach in the store and it costed me like 4 dollars, I felt it was too much. In my currency, 1 dollar means 13.000 Indonesian Rupiah. So, I always like “Really? 4 dollars for a little amount of spinach? In Indonesia, I will get a lot!”. It is so funny. So, now I try harder to avoid that habitual. It is useless to convert our currency to US dollar.

The second thing is, I feel it is a little bit uncomfortable to drink from the faucet directly, because in my hometown, we boil the water first before drinking it. My program coordinator said that it is safe here to drink directly from the faucet, so yah, now I am feel comfortable with that stuff.

About my new friends, all of them are so friendly and helpful. Sometimes, I find it is a little bit difficult to communicate because English is not our mother tongue, but that is the way to improve our communication skill. We learn many things together, we learn how to respect others’ opinion, others’ belief, and others’ culture. It is a very interesting thing for me, because it makes me be an open-minded person, and see the whole world with new perspective.

I believe that soon, I will experience many new things, and maybe have some culture shock about living in this country, but I hope that those things can make me a better person in the future. I always say to my own self that I must be a better person, and open myself to every new thing and try to deal with those stuffs. America, let’s get along!

Post written by Reski Puspitasari A. Sululing, CCI Participant at NOVA-Annandale from Indonesia

My Experience in First Two Weeks

I am Shruv. When I reached at Washington DC I was very scared, unknown country, unknown people, and unknown rules. There was a lot of thoughts in my mind, But when I came to my apartment I was just shocked my roommates were too friendly with me, which I never expected. They treat me as a younger brother.

When I went to the campus I was silent and I just talk to my few friends, but the other guys came to me and they want to know about me which I had lack in my country. Now every single day I feel like a celebrity everyone want to know about me, my culture, and my customs. My friends never said anything wrong about my English cause my English is not good yet.

After joining this program my confidence level is increased day by day, also I knew a very important thing that is ‘don’t judge a book by his cover’.

This program is not just going to teach me about my major subject this will also teach me how to be a good person in life. Not only this program every single participant taught me something. Sometimes I inspired by their lifes how they achieved this opportunity. Now I am able to know many countrys culture, ethics by their ambassador beside if this thinks we have  a guide a very caring guide miss Kate and Kelly who teach us how to deal with our problems and encouraging us.

So it is a very nice experience for me to join such a huge program and thank you so much.

The thing I most like about people they listen to me and they tell me what is good for me . Thank you so much for a beautiful journey which just begin now.

 

Post written by Shuvajit Saha, 2017-2018 CCI participant at NOVA-Alexandria from India

My educational experience at NOVA Annandale, US

My first class at NOVA Annandale campus was full of nervousness and exciting as well. I was residing somewhere in second row and being an international student so many questions were arising in my mind. I was nervous thinking that will I be able to compete with the fellows who are all native Americans, what if couldn’t perform well in class, what if I fail? Suddenly a very serious person enters in the class room and without introduction he asks us to move to another class, then another class…??

When he was asking us to move to another class, again different question was arising in my mind, but I was totally new to that environment so I decided to just follow the “crowd” the other students. Somehow, I was expecting that my fellows will ask who is that person, why we are following him, but personally I couldn’t get that courage to ask those questions. Finally, he took us to third class and then he broke the silence by asking the questions I had in my mind. Who is he?  No answer from the whole class. Second question, why we are following if we don’t know him? Few of the fellows responded like might be he is someone from college management which made us all laugh but he said I will be teaching your xyz in this semester. Surprised …!!!

Professor Stacey “SLY” Young while conducting a session

It was surprising for me because so far, I didn’t have any such kind of experience during my studies. Most of our professors were very bossy, it was difficult to have fun with them and even there were very strict rules to talk with a professor. Mostly it depends upon how good a student is in pleasing a professor and sometimes those students succeed to get the attention who get good marks in the class. Being a shy person and kind of an average level student, I never succeeded to make some good relations with any of my previous professors in my own country. When the professor said I will be teaching you xyz subject in this semester, then most of my fear disappeared automatically as he was frank, funny and at the same time very inspiring.

It’s a saying that “the first impression is the last impression”. That first class suddenly changed my way of thinking and my nervousness turned into excitement. Focusing on my studies was one of my top priorities in my plans and it really became interesting the way professors were encouraging me to be open, to speak up, to go in front of the class, to participate in groups. Another important point I have noticed during my studies that most of the professor teach you perform well in your real work instead of focusing on your marks. All the students in my class had their business ideas and most of them had their own business and those studies were clearing their concepts which they had to implement on their work. Further, with my experience, I have noticed that since students are attending their class regularly, submitting their assignments, homework and participating in their class no body fails. A student should not have a fear to fail the subject, which is also understandable as it is very common in student of developing countries. Students should focus on to gain actual knowledge in the field of their interest.

Picture taken with Professor SLY

The most inspiring thing about my education in the US was building a good relationship with my professors. They just do not teach you a subject or for just one semester, they are always interested to listen about your future goals, your achievement and with my own experience I can surely say that they will be always there for you to make you successful. No matter how difficult name you have professors always try their best to remember your name. Before studying at NOVA Annandale, it was the most difficult thing to get a recommendation letter from my professors while applying for different scholarship, and during my studies all the teacher kept asking me, if they can help me in any way I should write an email any time. Now I am an alumnus of NOVA Annandale as it has been few months since I have completed my studies, but still few of my professors keep asking me about my activities and future plans, which really means a lot for me.

In conclusion, my studies in the US gave me a real meaning of education, what success meant to be, role of professors in helping weak students during studies and after completion of their studies. I will recommend all the new students to be punctual in class, participate in discussions, don’t hesitate to speak up loudly, ask questions then success is yours and get the best advantage of this great opportunity in making some good relations with your professors, fellows , coordinators and those who can help you in making a successful leader in future.

Post written by Naik Alam, CCI Participant at NOVA 2016-2017, Pakistan

Mary, Terry, and Cessy

“Hi, this is Cessy. An exchange student from Indonesia. She’s doing a scholarship program funded by US Department of State and she’s studying Tourism and Marketing at NOVA. I and Terry are her social hosts, we help her to socialize that’s why we bring her here today”, said Mary when she introduced me to one of her neighbors.

“Oh hi, so does she live with you?”, her neighbor asked.

“No, they put her and her other friends in their own apartment. We will just take her out for dinner or to do other fun stuff”, Mary answered. 

I remember attending 2 social parties in Mary and Terry’s neighborhood, that’s how I got to know deviled egg (hard-boiled eggs that have been shelled, cut in half, and filled with a paste made from the egg yolks mixed with other ingredients such as mayonnaise and mustard – Wikipedia) and I like it. The second party was my favorite because it was a barbecue party, we had a lot of meat. Even though I love meat but the best part of the party was when everybody sat surrounding a stove with burning fire while singing old American songs, it was fall and the weather was cold. Everyone was so nice and welcoming, what a lovely neighborhood! I remember thinking this was the ideal American neighborhood I saw on TV and movies, where everybody knows everybody and gets together once in awhile, Mary even has a book club with the other ladies. Compared to the place where I lived which is a complex of townhouses it was totally different. I lived there for 10 months but I never even really “talked” to my neighbors, most of the time you would just look at each other sometimes with no smiles and continued to mind your own business. Hanging out with Mary and Terry’s neighbors really opened my eyes that yes this kind of neighborhood does exist. 

Mary and Terry loved to involve me in their family’s gatherings as well and that’s how I learned about American values of family. In my country whenever we have a big celebration we love to involve everybody including our relatives and friends and it will take days to celebrate. For example during Christmas in my hometown, we Christian will celebrate it for the whole month till New Year and even days after that by opening our house for people to come and visit us. We will have cakes and snacks and drink for people to have and the next day other people will come sometimes even strangers. But in United States I learned that when it comes to big holidays like Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter, it should be spent with your family and closest friends and it will only take one day or couple days of celebration depends on how many invitations you get. Of course sometimes they also invite other people like me, but family comes first unless you live far away from them then you may get invited to join your friend’s family or to join a celebration at church. I celebrated my first Thanksgiving with them and they even let me slept over. I was able to help them cleaning the house and then I met their son, granny and some of their good friends. We had big feast. It was a lot of fun. During Easter, I went to their church and then we went to Mary’s sister’s house. I helped them hiding the eggs for the kids and Mary made the most delicious bird’s nest cake (traditional cake for Easter) I’ve ever tasted.

Terry is an artist, he has a job but during his spare time he will make beautiful things from wood. Their house is filled with his creations and I love all of them. Terry is also funny, he loved to tease me pretending like he forgot which college I go to, he often told people that I went to George Mason University instead of NOVA. He’s a cool father and a great husband. I loved seeing how Terry and Mary work together and support each other as husband and wife. In my country usually wife is on the lower position than the husband but in their family both of them are equal, they’re a team. 

Two weeks before my birthday, February 22nd 2017, I emailed them saying that I would love to cook for them Indonesian food and to invite them to have a birthday dinner at my place but they insisted to take me out instead as they said that’s how American do it so I agreed. When they came to pick me up I noticed that Terry seemed a bit down, later I figured out that he just lost his mother a week ago. I was so shocked and touched at the same time. The fact that they could’ve just cancelled our plan but they didn’t and instead they kept their promise to celebrate my birthday with me just overwhelming. I ended up having a heartwarming birthday celebration and to be honest it was the best one.

Post written by Picessylia Anakay, CCI participant at NOVA 2016-2017, Indonesia

Moving Forward

‘’Pluralist societies are not accidents of history. They are products of enlightened education and continuous investment by governments and all civil societies in recognizing and celebrating the diversity of the world’s citizen.’’
-Aga Khan IV

The greatest thing can happen only when you move your one foot forward, then you can’t imagine how many good things can come across you. Yes, I took one step forward to learn, to experience and to meet some good people. I came across an opportunity that seemed very interesting to me. I read the missions and goals of the organization and I decided that I want to be a part of this organization. It is a nonprofit organization named Atlas Corps. I applied for a position as the executive intern and luckily, I got accepted for the position. I was glad and nervous at the same time. I asked my friends how am I going to do it well, they answered ‘just believe in yourself’. Believe me this simple advice helped to bring the best out of me.

My first day at Atlas Corps was great and I can’t forget that one moment I saw different faces with beautiful welcoming smile. They introduced me to everyone and by seeing their smiling faces gave me the comfort. My supervisor is the greatest person I’ve ever met, Mr. Calum Field, who welcomed and showed me around the office.

On that day, my first assignment was something I’ve never done before and it excited me that I was going to learn something new. Mr. Calum Field is a very well-planned and active Executive Assistant   and on the higher position is Mr. Scott Beale, the Executive Director, a great man with great ideas. I found him very friendly and helpful. I came across many good things I can learn from them such as; how international organizations works, how they put together the work and idea of a diverse group of leaders. They all are leaders from different countries and I found myself as part of the team. My contribution was little but valuable for them as well as for me. What they do is they bring young leaders from all around the world to the United States of America to do volunteer work for one year. Atlas Corps is an international network of leaders of nonprofit organizations and they all promote innovation, cooperation, and solutions to address critical social challenges by building young leaders, and supporting innovation through an overseas fellowship of skilled professionals.

 

 

 

 

This internship taught me many things and increased my network as well. I am glad that there is an organization like Atlas Corps that focuses on developing professional youth and promoting innovations among skillful young leaders. Atlas Corps gives opportunity to the youths and focuses on their contribution to the economy.

I am also grateful for CCI Program for giving me such an opportunity to learn and to improve my leadership skills, networking skills and to learn from some great individuals.

Post written by Meher Sultana, CCI participant at NOVA 2016-2017, Pakistan

Experience the CCI Program through the voices of the students