Tag Archives: Culture Shock

The Taste of America in First Two Weeks

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” –Eleanor Roosevelt

I remember, when I was in elementary school, I wrote many things in my Hello Kitty diary; about my favorite things, about my first shoes that I bought from my savings, also about my dreams. I did not know why in that time, I wrote that I really want to go abroad someday, and I wrote “I will go to America”.

Until I graduated from the university, I always looking for many opportunities to go abroad. One day, I tried my best to apply the CCI Program, that brought me to The United State now. Sometimes, I feel that it just like a dream. Many people said that I am lucky, but I don’t think so. I got this scholarship because of my effort, because I did my best until now.

Time flies. From sending the application, did the interview, orientation, until departure to the US, and now I have been in the US for two weeks. It’s not a very long time, but still, I learn many new things here. I mingle with many people, include my CCI friend from another country, some of American people, and taste many new things and new environment. I am so happy about those things. I feel like everything is going well. I eat well, sleep well, have a lot of fun, and earn something new in my school, Northern Virginia Community College.

From the orientation, my coordinator said that maybe all of us in the “honeymoon stage” right now, where everything seems good and exciting. It means that maybe in a couple of weeks ahead, we will face some culture shocks. I agree with that, but I hope that I will never experience the worse one. One of my biggest concern is missing my family in Indonesia, but thank God, we have so many options to keep in touch with our family through technology.

From my first two weeks in America, I learn a lot of things. First, prior my departure to this country, I thought that American people are arrogant, they hate Moslem people, they never smile, and all stereotyping things. Until I got here, I was totally wrong. Most of Americans are so friendly and helpful. They love to smile, and they say sorry and thank you in the easiest way. I mean, Indonesian people said that they are the friendliest people in the whole world, but they don’t do things like Americans. I can find many Indonesian people rarely say sorry when they did something wrong, also rarely say thank you to someone else. In America, they say those words easily.

The other thing that I found very interesting is, people in America are so on time. They appreciate time so much. Last week, when I arrived in my English class in the early morning, and I was the first one in the class, my professor said thank you to me for several times. I was so happy, because in Indonesia, when I arrived in a meeting point on time, no one cares. Also, when someone is coming late, no one cares.

But, not all the things are going well in this two weeks. I also feel somehow awkward with the situation here. The first thing that I feel it’s quite disgusting is I keep convert US dollar to my currency, and it drives me crazy. For example, when I bought spinach in the store and it costed me like 4 dollars, I felt it was too much. In my currency, 1 dollar means 13.000 Indonesian Rupiah. So, I always like “Really? 4 dollars for a little amount of spinach? In Indonesia, I will get a lot!”. It is so funny. So, now I try harder to avoid that habitual. It is useless to convert our currency to US dollar.

The second thing is, I feel it is a little bit uncomfortable to drink from the faucet directly, because in my hometown, we boil the water first before drinking it. My program coordinator said that it is safe here to drink directly from the faucet, so yah, now I am feel comfortable with that stuff.

About my new friends, all of them are so friendly and helpful. Sometimes, I find it is a little bit difficult to communicate because English is not our mother tongue, but that is the way to improve our communication skill. We learn many things together, we learn how to respect others’ opinion, others’ belief, and others’ culture. It is a very interesting thing for me, because it makes me be an open-minded person, and see the whole world with new perspective.

I believe that soon, I will experience many new things, and maybe have some culture shock about living in this country, but I hope that those things can make me a better person in the future. I always say to my own self that I must be a better person, and open myself to every new thing and try to deal with those stuffs. America, let’s get along!

Post written by Reski Puspitasari A. Sululing, CCI Participant at NOVA-Annandale from Indonesia

Hello! Hello… Hello?

When I first landed in the United States I was over the moon, like swimming in a warm lagoon, with expectations that could fill a room! A rhyme was necessary to proper show my excitement. Here I was, for one, I assumed I would easily assimilate with America because I had consumed American culture for, what seems like my entire life, through television, music and movies so I anticipated very few surprises; but as I have learned assumptions are not truth. I had created an amazing, grand image of the USA encouraged by movies and other mass media, then when this image and expectations were not met… it was a shock to the system.

One of the difficult shocks I dealt with is the way Americans communicate, particularly greeting. Where I come from, South Africa, acknowledging another person is important through verbal greeting or any type of salute, what I found here is that this verbal acknowledgment is replaced by some gesture, like a quick-to-fade smile or a head nod and that is only when they even decide to acknowledge you at all.

hello-there

Now, it has been difficult for me not to attribute this to some sort of moral degeneration in the USA or how very wrong it is not to acknowledge others properly instead I have been forced to recognise that it is just a difference in communication, a stark one though.

I had been bouncing in and out of this American form of communication for the past three months, where I would acknowledge and greet people, get so frustrated when this is not reciprocated that I’d stop trying. Then of course I would feel like a terrible person, return to my South African way of greeting, get very little back… and so it goes. But I made a decision to stay true to myself, and fortunately more and more people are catching on and saying Hello.

Post written by Lerato Mahloko CCI participant at NOVA, South Africa