Tag Archives: Dominican Republic

Sharing the Dominican Culture with the Girl Scouts

My adventure During the past few weeks I’ve had the opportunity to volunteer with a Girl Scouts Brownie Troop, led by Sara Mohamed. Someone I knew for being the Senior Program Manager for the CCI Program, but who I had the chance to know in what I perceive as one of the most important roles a woman can assume, being a mother.

Sara started this group because she wanted to give her daughter the chance to become a Girl Scout, but she couldn’t find enough leaders to start a troop near to where she lives, so she decided to be one. This was the beginning of a group of smart and kind girls that will later give me the opportunity to share my culture and identity as a Dominican citizen. We had several meetings with the girls where they learned some of the most important facts about the Dominican Republic. From our flag colors and what each of them means for the Dominican nation, to our delicious national dish called “La Bandera”. A plate conformed by rice, beans, chicken and green salad. They also learned about our traditional music, merengue and bachata, and we even had the chance to dance a few times.

Through an amazing internship I am doing at the Embassy of the Dominican Republic in Washington DC, we arranged a visit for the girls and a very special meeting with our Ambassador, José Tomás Pérez. My colleagues greeted the girls with so much love and excitement that I must exalt and reinforce the capacity of the Dominican people to make everyone feels welcome and loved when they meet us.  The girls and their parents were so thrilled to have this opportunity. They went beyond that when the Chief of Academic Affairs, Angie Martinez, told them that we were going to surprise the Ambassador in his office. They even learned how to say “Hola, Embajador” (Hi, Ambassador).

Girl Scouts with Jose Tomas Perez, Ambassador of the Dominican Republic in the United States.

The girls are learning about the Dominican Republic to represent my country at the World Thinking Day, an international event celebrated in 150 countries by Girl Scouts and Girl Guides on the month of March. The mission of this event is to show the girls the world we are living in and the impact each one of us have in our communities. I cannot end this post without giving full credit to my friends Eylül and Sara, from Turkey and Egypt, for being part of this experience and sharing the thing they have learned about my country with the girls.

The Girls creating their poster of the Dominican Republic for the World Thinking Day.

I feel honored for being given this opportunity and I hope the girls continues to grow and learn about many other countries of the world.

Looking forward for March!

Post written by Marlin Chabely Estevez  from the Dominican Republic , a 2018-2019 CCI participant at NOVA-Annandale.

 

The end of the first semester, my first 5 months abroad and the beginning of a new chapter in my life

As the semester ends challenges become more real, but so are the lessons it taught us. In one hand, we have the expectation of getting good grades and ending well our first academic semester. While in the other hand, we start to wrap everything up, and putting things under perspective. The things we did right, the positive impact we made, the goals we already reached, the things we will need to work on a little bit more, or the personal/professional challenges we still need to overcome. One thing I’ve done is reviewing my overall performance during the fall semester, not only at school but also in any of the other pillars of the CCI program.

Marlin with Kelly Forbes, the CCI coordinator for the Annandale campus of Northern Virginia Community College.

After going through this personal evaluation, and focusing on the things that needed some extra work, I realized the following things that can wrap up my first semester as an international exchange student in the United States: I wasn’t being too active with the activities and plenty opportunities around me, I could have focused more on maximizing my time in this country and not pay that much attention, time and effort to momentary things and lastly, I could commit more to master procrastination. In my opinion, losing your focus or feeling demotivated and overwhelmed from time to time is usual, when you have so many things to do and to think about at once, but I also know that if you don’t make a commitment to push yourself in those exact moments you probably won’t achieve your goals. Because that extra effort is the one determining whether you move and grow or stay the same person in the same old place.

Marlin with the CCI cohorts from the Dominican Republic, who came to visit Washington DC for the winter break.

For that reason, I made the commitment with myself to engage more with school activities next semester, to risk more, get out of my comfort zone more often and be more conscious about my emotions and the things around me that affect me in some way. Our time to go back home is closer every day and I know that when I return to my country I want to remember this time as a transformational experience in my life. It will only be transformational if I do my part and push myself to my limits and develop the discipline I need to complete my purpose in this program and in life itself.

I’ll close, by saying that I am beyond grateful for this time in the USA and the lessons I’ve learned so far. For making it through this program that is far from being easy but is such a worthy experience. For being alive and able to learn something new every day, for my new international friends, for traveling to new places and for staying true to myself and my values during this time.

Marlin on a rainy day in Washington, DC.

Looking forward for even more greater results in the next semester,

Post written by Marlin Chabely Estevez  from the Dominican Republic , a 2018-2019 CCI participant at NOVA-Annandale.

My First Three Weeks in the United States

I remember the day I was finally in the Pre-Departure Orientation Process at the US Embassy in the Dominican Republic, I was feeling anxious, excited and even afraid of what was about to happen. I knew that, in just a few days my life was about to change in such a positive and more productive way, and if you add the fact that it takes 5 months to complete the whole process and be selected for the CCI Program, I’d say that not even believing that you were awarded the opportunity to study abroad for 10 months, seemed like a very normal feeling.

When I landed at the Washington Dulles everything was just as expected, I met Kate Burkett, the program coordinator for NOVA Alexandria Campus, and the others CCI cohorts, and from that moment on I’ve been feeling nothing but joy, gratefulness and an immense desire to get as much knowledge as I can not only in my field of study but also about the American culture and my CCI friends cultures as well.

Cross-Cultural Potluck lunch on July 22, 2018

One thing that made an impression on me was that my first week in the United States happened to be my very first travel outside of my country but to my surprise, they were many others participants going through the same experience, so with the help of my program coordinator at NOVA Annandale, Mrs. Kelly Forbes and Ms. Kate Burkett from Alexandria, we quickly started to get set up into our new life; meeting our apartment mates, getting to know the cultural similarities and differences that we have and taking our first steps into the Community College Initiative Program with the Gateway to Success Program.

Marlin with LaRita Campbell, Program Officer at the United States Department of State’s Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs, and Sara Mohamed, CCI Senior Program Manager.

So far, I’ve been in the states for three weeks, but the things I’ve learned in this short time makes it feel like it has been months. Such as cultural diversity, cohabit with people that are not you’re family or your lifetime friends, but somehow are becoming the first thing you think when someone mention home and how not to stand out how gently and helpful Americans have been with all of us during this process of getting used to a new system. Once again, I confirm that there must be opportunities like this for people like me and whoever is reading this in order to help us grow and realize of the power and impact that we all have in life and most important in our society. Thank you to the US Department of State, the Community College Consortium and The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs for taking a chance on us and believing in young people as the future of our nations.

CCI NOVA 2018-2019 Cohort

I’m looking forward to all the opportunities that this year may bring.

Post written by Marlin Chabely Estevez Leon, 2018-2019 CCI Participant at NOVA-Annandale from the Dominican Republic

My Internship Experiences

Since the very beginning of the program I was very concerned about getting an internship. What is it about? How do I get an internship? What am I going to do? An internship is a type of job training where you are responsible to learn about your specific field of study or about how it is to have a job in a different organization, company, environment and even country. It is also very important for your future because doing internships help you not only to learn and get experience but also to establish relationships that you would probably need in the world of business. Furthermore, it helps you to have a more complete resume by having these experiences.

I am one of the lucky guys who had chances for internships early in the year of the program. I am doing some of my internship hours at Northern Virginia Family Service, an organization dedicated to helping the vulnerable families and individuals of Northern Virginia to find paths to stability and realize their full potential. I have always liked to help others and that is what it feels like by interning at NVFS.

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I acquired this internship in an easy way. Our coordinators organized an Internship/Volunteer Fair at the NOVA Annandale campus, where we had to dress formally and present our elevator speeches. While I was exploring the different opportunities with organization representatives, one of them said to me, “don’t go, I need your Spanish!” and that is where my internship journey started.

In this internship, I have been doing different things to contribute in the organization. I am learning from many sources; from my field of study to my personal daily life. The very first day of the internship I was treated as a normal employee of the organization. I was even invited to a meeting that is held regularly to review important information about the organization. It made me feel part of the team immediately.

My second internship experience is based on my field of study, which is Information Technology. My professor helped me to get this internship where I get to put to practice the things he taught me in class and even many more things about networking. I know much more than I did before I started. In this internship, I learn while giving technical support to one of the NOVA campus buildings in Annandale.

It’s amazing how I got along in these internships so easily. The purpose for organizations to give internship opportunities is not to selfishly avoid payment or increase profits; they want to help you achieve your goals! In my point of view, this is what internships are for-  to let you feel part of something bigger, something you can be part of, a place where you build not only your professional skills but also a vision for the future; your own future and the world’s future.

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Post written by Edzon Aquino Pineda, CCI Participant at NOVA 2016-2017, Dominican Republic