Category Archives: News

Feb 24 New Faculty Orientation #7 WO Campus

New Faculty First Year Experience #7 – February – Woodbridge Campus

February 24, 2017 , 1:00 – 3:00 pm , WAS 116

Last month we asked you to tell us the topics you would most like to cover in the next 3 workshops. Please email Frances ( fvillagrangl@nvcc.edu) or Robin (rmuse@nvcc.edu) so they may incorporate your ideas and needs. Here is the campus map and the address for your GPS is:

2645 College Drive
Woodbridge, VA 22191

Register: Please click on the link so we may count food and supplies.

If you have a teaching conflict, please email Robin at rmuse@nvcc.edu

 

Nov. 17th VCCS First Year and Adjunct Faculty Institute

VCCS OPD


VCCS First Year and Adjunct Faculty Institute

The VCCS First Year and Adjunct Faculty Institute is designed for teaching faculty who are new the the VCCS and for VCCS adjunct faculty. The 2016 Institute will be held November 17-18, 2016 at the Wyndham Virginia Crossings Hotel & Conference Center in Glen Allen, VA.

The First Year and Adjunct Faculty Institute features sessions from outstanding VCCS leaders and presenters and a keynote address by Dr. Todd Zakrajsek.  For more information, please click on the link.

NISOD Free Webinar, Wednesday, October 12,2016 200-3:00

Empowering Faculty With Course-Level Data to Drive Institutional Change

Giving faculty access to all course-level data has been nothing short of revolutionary for the culture of Pierce College. We knew that sending student success data to faculty would not be enough. The college sought to provide faculty with direct access to their own data (and the data of their colleagues), with the ability to sort student achievement data by course, section, modality, timeframe, subsequent success, and a variety of demographic measures. To this end, Pierce’s Center for Engagement and Learning began providing frequent training to help faculty members understand their data. In this session, participants will learn not only why they might want to do something similar at their colleges, but how to achieve it with minimal cost and/or pushback.

Tom Broxson, District Dean, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Pierce College (WA)

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Eastern: 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Contact Robin Muse ( rmuse@nvcc.edu )  for User and Password to access this FREE WEBINAR to all NOVA Faculty and Professional Staff

2 NOVA Faculty Advising Workshops – Don’t Miss Out

Friday, October 14 – Faculty Advising Basics (1 hour)

Location: Pender/Fairfax Campus , 3922 Pender Drive,  Fairfax

Room: 150

Time: 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfVIdpYd8TGKW1tbHPAxfaPBwSB83Z94eHGTwgHkY3CJW34lw/viewform

– Roles & Expectations of Faculty Advisors @ NOVA

– Types of NOVA Students & What to Expect

– College Catalog & Advising Resources

– PeopleSoft Basics for Faculty Advising

– Student Success Planner Overview for Faculty Advising

Friday, October 21 – Transfer Advising for Faculty Advisors (1 hour)

Location: Pender/Fairfax Campus , 3922 Pender Drive,  Fairfax

Room: 150

Time: 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfVIdpYd8TGKW1tbHPAxfaPBwSB83Z94eHGTwgHkY3CJW34lw/viewform

Topics Covered:

– Roles & Expectations of Faculty Advisors in Transfer Planning

– Transfer Guides & Resources

– Guaranteed Admissions Agreements & Articulation Agreements

– Best Practices and Tips from Transfer Counselors

Northern Virginia Regional Center for Teaching Excellence Upcoming Events

                                                                                    

VCCS logo

Northern Virginia Regional Center
for Teaching Excellence
Save the Dates

 

The Northern Virginia Regional Center for Teaching Excellence (RCTE) offers professional development opportunities to faculty and staff at Germanna Community College, Lord Fairfax Community College, and Northern Virginia Community College.

Northern Virginia Regional Center events scheduled for fall 2016 are listed below. Unless otherwise stated, RCTE events are free to VCCS employees and open to all full- and part-time faculty, staff, and administrators.
For event details and registration information, click on the name of the event below, or email Camille Mustachio, Northern Virginia RCTE Chair, at cmustachio@germanna.edu.

Upcoming Northern Virginia Regional Center Events
The Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Student Success

Germanna Community College

Fredericksburg Campus

October 14, 2016
10:00 am – 2:00 pm
Student Engagement: Proven Strategies That Work

Lord Fairfax Community College

Middletown Campus

October 28, 2016

10:00 am – 2:00 pm

A Truly Inclusive Classroom

Northern Virginia Community College
Woodbridge Campus

November 11, 2016

10:00 am – 2:00 pm

 

If you are interested in attending a Northern Virginia Regional Center event and are VCCS faculty, staff, or administration outside the Northern service region, please contact Northern Virginia RCTE Chair Camille Mustachio at cmustachio@germanna.edu.

 

VCCS REGIONAL CENTERS FOR
TEACHING EXCELLENCE
VCCS OFFICE OF PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
www.opd.vccs.edu

2 NISOD Student Opportunities to Tell Your Students


A membership organization committed to promoting and celebrating
excellence in teaching, learning, and leadership at community and technical colleges.

 

Scott Wright Student Essay Contest

One of your students can win a $1,000 and a trip to Austin! The annual Scott Wright Student Essay Contest honors Scott Wright, past editor of Community College Week. Student authors are to describe a faculty member, staff member, or administrator who encouraged them to complete a course, finish a semester, or graduate from college, and how that encouragement helped them reach their goal. Learn more about criteria, terms, deadlines, and prizes here.

Community College Scholarships and Internships

Student Veterans of America is providing six (6) $2,500 scholarships to student veterans currently attending a community college. Visit here for full details.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science is accepting applications for its Community College Internships Program for the 2017 spring term. Visit here for full details.

 

NISOD- Innovation Abstracts- Transforming Classrooms Into Active Learning Zones

Innovation Abstracts

Volume XXXVIII, No. 16 | August 26, 2016

Transforming Classrooms Into Active Learning Zones

While student response systems (SRS) have been around well over a decade, it was not until recently that I began to take advantage of their pedagogical benefits. In the span of time since my first implementation of SRS-associated peer-instruction approaches (about five years ago), SRS technology has greatly evolved from hand-held clickers to Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) cloud-based classroom interaction systems. Undeniably, the evolution of cloud-based has opened the door to teaching and learning approaches that were previously impossible to implement or were limiting in nature, especially in large enrollment courses.

For example, the ability to ask students questions using varying types of formats, including short-answer questions, image quizzes, and ordering, in addition to multiple choice questions via the cloud-based system, support the efforts of educators to enhance the learning experience in diverse ways. Additionally, built-in features such as “ask an anonymous question” and the “confused flag” give students additional opportunities to communicate with their professor during class time and empower professors to build a stronger learning community by creating seamless links between students and themselves.

Most research on the benefits of using SRSs in the classroom has shown that the wise use of such systems can help assess prior knowledge, poll student attitudes, confront common misconceptions, transform the way you demonstrate, test students’ understanding and retention, test conceptual understanding, facilitate discussion and peer instruction, and increase classroom attendance. Research also shows that students become engaged and enjoy using the technology. I certainly had that experience after implementing the Echo360-ALP for the first time in my second-year large enrollment course (three sections of approximately 200 students each). Indeed, the experience has transformed my classroom into an active learning zone and continues to do so to this day.

For example, analytics provided by the Echo360-ALP showed that:

  • The participation rate (based on the number of students submitting answers to questions I asked in class during a given class) was nearly 99 percent on a per-lecture basis.
  • Approximately 70 percent of students, on a per-lecture basis, took class notes via the notetaking features of the program—350-500 words during lectures that were more traditional in nature, and fewer words on days where active engagement activities (e.g. many SRS questions were asked) were the primary mode of instruction.
  • Students submitted 5-10 questions (using the “ask an anonymous question” feature) per class and indicated confusion (using the confusion flag) during problematic concepts. The questions that were submitted were answered either during class time or soon after.

Based on classroom observations, student comments, and efforts by our Teaching and Learning Support Services (TLSS) team to deploy the Echo360-ALP on our campus, factors that appear to contribute to the high rate of student engagement in my classroom include:

  • Low cost: Echo360-ALP is offered to students free of charge at the University of Ottawa. Thanks to efforts by our TLSS team, this effectively takes advantage of the BYOD movement and eliminates additional costs students may have incurred had they been required to purchase access to the cloud-based system or physical clickers.
  • Low-stakes participation: Approximately 15 percent of the overall grade was dedicated to participation marks. If students answered (correctly or incorrectly) 80 percent of the total questions asked throughout the term, they received full participation marks. If they participated less than 80 percent, their participation mark was calculated as a percent of the submission rate divided by 80. This approach provided flexibility by allowing for absences or malfunctioning issues related to their devices, for example. With the solution being cloud-based, some students also valued the flexibility of being able to participate from a different location. Though I did not originally intend to use the solution in that way, I must admit that they are engaged in some manner!

This technology provides many mechanisms to help educators break out of the traditional mold and establish learning communities within their classroom to fulfill their teaching and learning objectives. For me, these include actively engaging students during class periods, facilitating low-stakes testing and enabling anonymous participation, providing and receiving real-time feedback and insights based on students’ questions and answers, and questioning students using a multitude of question types.

Does Fearless Engagement Translate Into Class Performance?
To answer this question, I share below my observations of trends in class performance through the lens of final exam average scores, as well as learning gains and item analysis scores from a validated concept assessment test. Overall, these assessments are designed to measure a series of prescribed course-level learning outcomes.

The final exam average has been steadily increasing (about 68 percent to about 75 percent) compared to the years prior to introducing SRSs into my classroom (about 65 percent). Concomitantly, the proportion of students in the A and B ranges of our letter grade system increased and the proportion of students in the C and D ranges decreased. Moreover, failing rates decreased from five percent of the class to one percent.

Because exam questions and difficulty may differ from year to year along with group abilities, and despite all the good intentions to formulate thoughtful and useful questions to assess student learning, final exam scores may not necessarily serve as good indicators of class success. An alternative way to assess classroom performance is through the use of pre-validated concept inventories. Concept inventories are tools designed to help educators evaluate students’ understanding of a specific set of concepts and identify misconceptions. Unlike typical multiple choice question tests, both questions and response choices are the subject of extensive research designed to determine what a range of people think a particular question is asking and what the most common answers are. In its final form, the concept questions present correct answers and distractors that are based on commonly held misconceptions. If valid and reliable, concept inventory data can be used to measure student learning over the duration of the course and provide educators data that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of classroom interventions and, thus, learning.

As matter of habit to assess teaching and learning, a genetic concept inventory (Smith et al., 2008), which comprises a set of 25 multiple-choice questions designed to measure the aforementioned course learning outcomes is administered at the beginning (pre-assessment) to get a baseline level of student understanding and again at the end of the course (post-assessment). Analyses of the results of the student performance on the concept assessment test administered to my classes prior and after my use of SRSs revealed the following:

  • Students do better on almost all the questions in the post-assessment phase when compared to years where SRSs were not used.
  • Learning gains have progressively increased (yr1= 48%, yr2=53%, yr3=60%, yr4=60%) compared to 30-36% prior to using SRS-linked peer instruction methods.

Here, I make no claim that the data provide convincing arguments for a causal relationship between student engagement and success in the classroom. Using evidence-based student focused activities in my classroom, the data presented above are consistent with investigations that demonstrate that educational conditions and practices that foster student engagement contribute to student success. So, does leveraging the features of the Echo360-ALP translate into classroom success? I will let you be the judge of that.

Strategic Uses of Echo360 Classroom Solutions to Enhance Teaching and Learning Effectiveness in the Classroom

Through my use of this tool, I am consistently finding new ways to leverage its features to maximise the student learning experience—and let’s not forget the educator’s teaching experience! Insofar as concept inventory data are concerned, they cannot only be used to evaluate the effectiveness of classroom interventions, but also can be used to identify student misconceptions and problematic concepts, allowing for pedagogical approaches to be designed to address them. In my genetics course, student difficulties that are often identified are typically related to misconceptions and application of analytical thinking to formulate hypotheses to solve problems. Indeed, data from the item analysis of student answers on the concept assessment test not only serve as a catalyst for reflection and designing approaches to address the difficulties, but also to evaluate their effectiveness.

Implementing approaches to address problematic concepts and misconceptions is not a trivial task, especially in large enrollment courses. In this respect, Echo360-ALP features, such as the different ways to ask your class a question, have paved the way for facilitating the integration of teaching and learning approaches to mitigate difficult concepts and misconceptions. With the identification of the common misconceptions and the concepts that are most difficult to the students, the Echo360-ALP facilitates active learning and formative assessment opportunities to improve student performance by offering a diversity of approaches to set-up instruction and reflections on prior knowledge (to provoke thinking, stimulate discussions, and induce cognitive conflicts); to develop knowledge (tackle misconceptions, exercise skills, and conceptual understanding, judging, etc.); communicate (asking questions, answer questions); and assess learning (exit polls, probe limits of understanding, demonstrate success, and review). Indeed, while the Echo360-ALP offers educators endless ways to engage students’ intellectual domains, I find it also offers diverse opportunities to reach out to their affective domain and metacognition.

So, this brings us back full circle to student engagement. Does student engagement translate into successful learning? I believe the Echo360 classroom solution offers educators opportunities to engage students in fearless reflection, interactivity, collaboration, community, discovery, and exchange—hallmarks of academes—regardless of class size!

Colin Montpetit, Assistant Professor, Biology

For further information, contact the author at the University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5. Email:colin.montpetit@uottawa.ca

New Faculty Class of 2016-2017 Start Strong!

 

NOVA welcomed thirty-four new teaching faculty this semester.

NFO 2016-17 classFullSizeRender

The Center for Teaching & Learning (CETL) hosted a New Faculty Orientation seminar on Wed, August 17th with jammed pack sessions geared to help new faculty start strong. Topics included; student services, advising, CARES, disability services, Title IX, educational technology and assessment. College president, Dr. Scott Ralls welcomed the group and highlighted the uniqueness and importance of NOVA and the students we serve.  CETL will be bringing back the year long New Faculty First Year Experience this year.  The faculty cohort will meet on a monthly basis. Fourteen faculty hired last year also attended the day long orientation. For more information, go to https://blogs.nvcc.edu/cetl

NFO 2016-17 Dr. Ralls

Attached:

  1. Group picture
  2. Dr. Ralls welcomes new faculty to NOVA photo by Kevin Mattingly