Mapping Travel Sites for National Geographic

I advised National Geographic recently on two travel books. National Geographic recruited me to review more than 50 maps and to make text comments where geographic information needed to be updated. Research involved lots of satellite images, government maps, and email correspondence; edits made with Adobe Acrobat Pro DC software.

Coastal Alaska

The first book, “Coastal Alaska: Ports of Call & Beyond,” is a perfect destination if you are suffering from the Washington DC area’s heat. August temperatures are in the low 60s for most of the south coast of Alaska, including Anchorage. You can get even cooler by going into the mountains on the White Pass & Yukon scenic railway (image below).

The train travels 20 miles and climbs 3,000 feet amid ice capped mountains.
The train travels 20 miles and climbs 3,000 feet amid ice capped mountains.
Edits to map showing Yukon & White Pass railway (red line).
Edits to map showing Yukon & White Pass railway (red line).

 

 

 

 

The Caribbean

Mt. Obama, a popular hiking site on Antigua.
Mt. Obama, a popular hiking site on Antigua.
Boggy Peak renamed Mount Obama in 2009.
Boggy Peak renamed Mount Obama in 2009.

For those planning winter vacations, perhaps National Geographic’s Traveler guidebook, “The Caribbean: Ports of Call & Beyond,” is for you. This book includes travel information for tropical islands ranging from the Caymans to Trinidad and Tobago.

A map edit example involves Antigua’s highest point, where Boggy Peak was renamed to honor President Obama. Mount Obama is becoming a major attraction for Antigua (map and image below).

The guide on coastal Alaska was released earlier this year, and the Caribbean islands guide is scheduled for October 2016.