Category Archives: Leadership

Summer e-LEAD Program

Are you looking for an opportunity to identify and develop your overall leadership skills?

Leadership ConceptELI Student Life has created a virtual co-curricular opportunity to develop leadership skills for students!The overall goals of this program are to:

-Foster a sense of community among students taking online courses

-Develop more self-awareness of leadership strengths and skills

-Maximize your talents as they relate to academic and professional goals.

Throughout this 4-week a-synchronous program , participants will learn more about personal strengths (via the Clifton StrengthsFinder personality assessment and access to the StrengthsQuest e-book) and discuss how to utilize strengths to maximize leadership skills and potential with their peers. Participants will be expected to participate in weekly discussion posts, readings and journal assignments)  *This is a non-credit program, but a great resume builder!

Dates: June 6th – July 3rd

Time: Work at your pace with weekly deadlines for group discussions and journal reflections.

Registration:   Leadership Pilot Program Registration Form. Please fill out no later than June 3rdth at 11:59pm.  

 Please reach out to elistulife@nvcc.edu with any questions.

SAAM KICK OFF!

ThinkstockPhotos-180121101April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM)! The goal of SAAM is to raise public awareness about sexual violence and to educate communities on how to prevent it.  Sexual violence is a major public health, human rights and social justice issue. We need everyone’s help to end it. The NOVA Community can help make a difference!

NOVA Sexual Assault Services (SAS) would like you to get involved during SAAM! NOVA SAS is hosting several events this month:

April 6th – April 10th: Red Flag Campaign Week (Annandale Campus)

April 9th: Red Flag Info Table (Annandale Campus – CF Quad)

April 9th: Walk a Mile in Her Shoes (Annandale Campus – CF Quad)

April 13th – April 17th: Red Flag Campaign Week (Medical Education Campus)

April 14th: Jackson Katz: “Violence Against Women-it’s a men’s issue” Roundtable (Alexandria Campus – Women’s Center)

April 16th: Red Flag Info Table (Medical Education Campus – 1st Floor)

April 16th: Student Government Association (SGA) Benefit Concert   (Annandale Campus – Ernst Theater)

April 20th – April 24th:  Red Flag Campaign Week (Loudoun Campus)

April 21st: Red Flag Info Table (Loudoun Campus – Front of LR)

April 21st: Take Back the Night (Loudoun Campus – Side entrance of LW)

April 28th: Bystander Intervention Roundtable (Alexandria Campus – Women’s Center)

April 29th: Denim Day (Annandale Campus – CF Quad)

If you would like more information regarding these events, please contact Angela Acosta at aacosta@nvcc.edu or 703-323-2406 or like us on Facebook

If you are in need of services, please contact NOVA SAS at nova.sas@nvcc.edu or text/call 703-338-0834 (24 hours / 7 days a week).

-Written by: Angela Acosta, Sexual Assault Services (SAS) Outreach Specialist, NOVACares Office 

Managing the Demands of School through Meditation

College students have a lot on their plates. Students’ have to maintain their jobs outside of school, fulfill the obligations of their personal relationships, and stay on top of the workload of each course! With these demands often conflicting with one another, the need for finding the balance between them is pressing. But how can it be done?

So often people fervently search for peace of mind as if it is the medal you win after making it through the maze of life. But what if the answer to finding balance is already within you and all it takes is for you to retreat within yourself to find it?

Now, the golden question, why should I even try it? I’m so glad you asked! Tons of research has been done on the efficacy of meditation and the benefits are numerous, in particular for the unique population of college students. Studies show that:

  • 30 minutes of meditation 7 days a week increases creativity and elevates mood (you can do this on your lunch break!)
  • Meditation reduced distractive and ruminating thoughts in distressed college students
  • Incorporating meditation into everyday life has shown to increase positive emotions in students
  • Meditation improved academic performance and school behavior, reduced anxiety, heightened self-compassion, and decreased notions of perfectionism and self-criticism in college students (Simply by sitting quietly for 15-20 minutes a day!)

Meditation doesn’t have to be this elaborate process that can only be done when you’re looking out of your third eye while standing on your head on top of a mountain. There are many activities that elicit a meditative, mindful, and relaxed state that you can do every day. Below are some suggestions; just find a quiet spot and try them.

  • Transcendental Meditation: Sit comfortably, breathe deeply, repeat a mantra internally to focus your energy, observe your thoughts and emotions rather than react to them
  • Guided Imagery Meditation: Picture a soothing scene, engage all your senses to make the image as real as possible (do you smell flowers? is there are breeze on your face?), let your mind get lost in the scene
  • Movement Meditation, i.e. walking, yoga, tai chi (and it’s great exercise)
  • Reading/quiet time: creates a great break from the mundane.

***Omvana is a great iPhone/iPad mediation app and it’s FREE!***

Starting your mornings off with a meditation exercise will ready you for the demands that lay ahead throughout your day by giving you a clear head and a more positive disposition. Taking a moment to recharge at work when you feel overwhelmed, doing a focused meditation on a specific topic, i.e. eliminating self-doubt, etc. can make all the difference in increasing productivity in all areas of your life. Remember that peace already resides in you and it is refocusing on that internal happiness that will better equip you to deal with whatever obstacle that comes your way. Namaste!

–Jennifer Reed, Student Success Coach, ELI

Contact me for the list of research articles used to write this post or for more meditation suggestions.

See other related blogs:

A Little Meditation Exercise to Refresh Your Brain

Getting a Good Start to Your Morning

ELI Leadership Common Experience: Week 5 cont..

Social Media Netiquette

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Earlier this week we stressed the importance of understanding proper “Netiquette” and creating a positive online presence when you are an online student. Have you thought about how you can continue to keep that positive positive presence  outside of that online classroom? That’s right, were talking about Social Media! Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube and many other sources that you can use to virtually be “social” with other people.

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With so many people using these forms of media, we want to share with you some helpful tips and reminders to maintain that positive presence in the digital social world. Learn more about Social Media Netiquette now.

 

Resources:

http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/social-media-statistics-2014_b57746

http://www.learnthenet.com/learn-about/social-netiquette/index.php

http://www.digitalsherpa.com/blog/how-social-media-has-changed-in-the-last-few-years/

ELI Leadership Common Experience: Week 5

Netiquette in the Online Classroom

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As we reach week 5 of our Leadership Common Experience, we want to discuss the very important topic of understanding online etiquette or what it is commonly referred to as Netiquette. As a virtual student, do you know how to properly and professionally address an instructor through email?  Have you struggled with how to write a clear and concise response for your class discussion posts? When almost 100% of your communication with your faculty member(s) and fellow students will be through text format, it is key to know how to make a good “virtual” impression. The below resources provide some great tips and tools to help maintain a positive online presence in the classroom as an online student.

“How To Be a Good Online Learner” -This resource reviews the do’s and don’ts of overall communication virtually and as an online student.

“The Etiquette around Discussion Forums” -Discussion posts are required for a majority of classes offered through ELI. When you compare an online course to one on a campus, this would be equal to your class attendance and participation. This is how an instructor and other students see your thoughts and insight on the course material. With this in mind, this article will give you some great tips on how to contribute to the class professionally and effectively.

What are some challenges that you face when it comes to communicating with staff, faculty and other peers as an online student?

Are there any other Netiquette tips that we missed? Please share them in the comments!

Introducing College Central Network (CCN)

NOVA students now have access to College Central Network (CCN). After registering with CCN, you will be able to:

  • Search for jobs posted exclusively to NOVA students as well as search for positions through Jobs Central® national job board and the Intern Central® national internship board
  • Build a resume with Résumé Builder and/or upload a résumé file to Resume Central®
  • Review your job search history within the system
  • Gain access to announcements, upcoming events, career advice documents, videos, podcasts, and career articles
  • Build an online portfolio in Career Portfolio Central®

Follow the steps below to get started using CCN:

  • Access CCN
  • Select “Students”
  • Select “Sign In”
  • Enter your Access ID and Password (Check your VCCS e-mail account for an e-mail with information about accessing CCN)
  • Click “Go”

What feature of College Central Network did you find most useful? Why?

Leadership Webinar Series: Joe Paul

This week’s webinar will be presented by Joe Paul on Thursday September 18th from 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm (EST). Register here.

Joe Paul ImageJoe Paul was born in Brooklyn, New York, partially raised in Miami, Florida and is the fifth of ten children who come from Haitian immigrant parents. Joe experienced many of the social ills that continue to plague American society at the tender age of thirteen when he was forced into independence. Joe experienced homelessness, growing up in foster homes and group homes and child abandonment. Although he experienced trials and tribulations early on in his journey, he was determined to finish his high school education against all odds.

After graduating from Miami Central Senior High School, his desire to further his education inspired him to apply to colleges and universities with uncertainty. Although his parents have the equivalence of an eighth grade education they maintained the wherewithal to encourage him to take advantage of his American education; an opportunity that was not afforded to them. He became the first person in his family to earn a college degree when he graduated from Florida State University where he reserved the honor of leading more than fifteen clubs and organizations including Student Government Association as well as serving as one of the few African-American Homecoming Chief in the history of the university. Joe Paul is a former National Brother of the Year as well as Assistant Vice-President for the Southern Region for Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

After graduating from Florida State, Joe moved to Los Angeles, California to pursue an acting career. He quickly found out that most actors in Hollywood are starving artist so he had to figure out a way to survive. He found solace once he was introduced to the Real Estate industry where he found a passion for helping others to achieve the American Dream of homeownership.

During this time, Joe continued to pursue another passion close to his heart; to inspire others through his touching testimony by motivationally and inspirationally speaking to others and through his writing. This passion encouraged him to leave the daily grind of the corporate world which inspired a move to the Washington DC area where he currently resides and runs his company. Joe Paul has been recognized by community, educational and business leaders including public servants as an outstanding citizen through dozens of awards and recognition.

Currently, he is the CEO of Motive8 corporation; a motivational speaking and corporate training organization. He is also a Professional Speaker, Certified Life Coach, and Blogger through www.JoePaulSpeaks.com. He is the author of “Morning Cup of Joe” and a devoted philanthropist. He respectively served as a board member of The Urban League and currently serves as a board member of the DC Seminole Alumni Association. He is a former national board member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., the MLK Foundation and is a current member of the NAACP Washington DC Branch and The Florida State Society of Washington DC. He is also the Founder and Senior Advisor for the “Toys for Boys” Initiative as well as the Chief Proprietor for The Haitian heART Gallery nonprofit organization where he raises funds through showcasing and auctioning Haitian art with the ultimate goal of building schools focused on the arts and humanity in Haiti.

ELI Leadership Common Experience: Week 4

Week 4 blog posts focus on the topic of Job and Career Exploration. The posts for this week are provided by ELI Counselor, Christy Jensen.

186090306During week two of the leadership common experience you learned about the importance of understanding self in the college environment. Self-assessment is also a key element in helping an individual identify an occupation or career that will be satisfying and fulfilling.  All NOVA students have access to FOCUS 2 – an interactive, self-guided career and education planning system that can help you with the following:

  • Select a major/program based on your interests and aspirations
  • Discover occupations matching your personal preferences and attributes
  • Map out your career plans, present and future
  • Make informed career decisions

The “Self-Assessment” section of FOCUS 2 includes assessments in the areas of work interest, personality, skills, and values. After responding to a few questions, you can begin to identify occupations/careers that are consistent with your work interests, personality, skills, and/or values. Be sure to follow-up with me by email or another NOVA career counselor if you have any questions about the assessments or to discuss your results. Students using FOCUS 2 for the first time will need to create an account. This is a simple, quick process. Learn more and get started with FOCUS 2.

While there are many resources available to help you explore career options, two additional ones I would like to highlight are your instructor/professor and the Exploring Career Options webinar.

During week three of the leadership common experience Instructor Hatheway shared – “If this course is in an area that you are considering pursuing as a career, ask your instructor for her/his insider knowledge, tips, resources, and so on. Teachers are nothing if not passionate about their subjects and desirous of helping students develop into the professionals they want to become.” This was an excellent suggestion as your instructor/professor can provide you with a first-hand look at the field. Not sure where to begin the conversation? Two questions to get started – How did you get started in <insert area/field of interest>? What advice would you give to someone interested in getting started in <insert area/field of interest>?

The Exploring Career Options webinar is a 45 minute webinar that focuses on using various online resources to research career options.  The relationship between programs of study at NOVA, college majors, and career options are discussed.  Resources presented provide information on nature of work, educational requirements, job outlook, and wages. When you register for the webinar you will receive several handouts that should be helpful to you with your career exploration. Request a free copy of a recorded session.

What occupation/career resource did you find most helpful? Why? What questions do you have about exploring career options?

Leadership Common Experience: Week 3

The Importance of Faculty Rapport

Check out the below entry from one of our ELI instructors on his thoughts about the importance of building rapport with faculty.

dog_pun_2Just before I started teaching my first online course I was worried about how well I’d be able to reach my students, both as a teacher and as a human being. Would Pun Dog be able to get the kind of help he needed in as clear a way as would happen were his instructor guiding him through his struggles with math in-person? And, more, could the teacher put him at ease by giving him a friendly tone through potentially cold screens full of text, unaccompanied by a friendly smile? Taken together, I worried that I couldn’t develop the sort of rapport I’d enjoyed with students I taught in the classroom.

As an online student you may have the same concerns, so I’m thrilled to say that all of my fears turned out to be unfounded. In fact, after that first course I went to a baseball game with one former student and met another for coffee when I was visiting NYC. Students shared photos of their children, we wrote back and forth about shared interests, etc.

All of this made for a fun class, but I’m certain it also lead to greater student success; when everyone has a sense of connection, even in a virtual classroom, there tends to be more of a sense of support, of presence, of caring, and so on, all of which serve to put everyone at ease and trust that their instructor is here to make you succeed. So having a strong student/teacher rapport is possible in an online environment, and also very beneficial.

Now, a lot of this is on the instructor, but I have found that my students, too, help create a harmonious relationship between them and myself. If you are proactive in creating a bond with your instructor, you just may find a better experience in your classes. Here are some ways you might try:

  • If you are asked to respond to your peers in discussion forums, go beyond the minimum reply and really push yourself to be expressive and helpful… this always opens my eyes and warms me towards the student. Similarly consider responding to those who comment on your work, including your instructor. Having a true back-and-forth doesn’t just have to happen in person.
  • Ask questions, be it in the question forum or via email. We want to know when you need help and, not being able to read body language/facial expressions, being able to do so can be difficult online. And asking us also makes us feel connected to you.
  • Use your sense of humor (when appropriate, of course), share some of your outside interests, etc.; it is possible to have fun and express ourselves online, and it’s a great way to get your peers and instructor to feel they have a genuine connection with you.
  • If this course is in an area that you are considering pursuing as a career, ask your instructor for her/his insider knowledge, tips, resources, and so on. Teachers are nothing if not passionate about their subjects and desirous of helping students develop into the professionals they want to become.

So there you have it… rapport with your online instructor is a vital component of a good experience, and you have the power to help bring it about. Trust me, it makes these classes so much more rewarding.

-Will Hatheway

ELI Adjunct Instructor of English

 

What questions do you have about creating relationships with your ELI instructors?

Leadership Common Experience: Week 2

Understanding Self in the College Environment

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Within week two of our Leadership Common Experience, we want to build on last week’s theme of success in an online education environment. We discussed important things to keep in mind when you are in the classroom and also how to stay engaged with other students and the college outside of the classroom.

An important aspect to also explore that can be an integral part of your college success is understanding yourself, your strengths, weakness, likes, dislikes, habits, how these qualities can effect your success perusing your education. What are ways you can be proactive and prevent these potential  stressors and obstacles from effecting your overall educational goals?

A great way to begin doing this is self-reflection.  Think about a typical day, the responsibilities you have and how much time  and energy is spent on each. How does your online education fit into this?  Will it drastically change your day to day routine? Are there other areas in which you spend your time that you can improve?

Here is a great article about Toxic Habits that Drain your Energy. Time and Energy work hand-in hand within your overall quality of life and this article gives some great everyday examples on how we can often lose this time and energy around things we can’t control.

How do you see your online education fitting into your personal day-today routine?

What are some other ways that we might mismanage our time and energy?