Category Archives: MEC Student Success

Information on MEC’s Student Success Initiatives including Orientation, First Year Experience and Student Life

MEC Student Services Online Options


Click Here M-F 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM for the MEC Student Services Virtual Lobby

You can also Dial into the lobby using your phone with one of the numbers below. You will be asked for a meeting id when dialing in. The Meeting ID  is  703 822 6531East coast particpants should use +1 646 558 8656 to dial in.

Appointments available from 9:30 AM to 11:00 AM and 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.

Appointments available from 9:00 AM to 10:30 AM and 2:00 PM to 7:00 PM on Monday and Thursday.

If you require captioning services please send an email to MECCousnelor@nvcc.edu so that they may schedule an interpreter/captioner for you, or we can use the chat with you within Zoom.


First and foremost, we care about you and your family’s safety and well-being. During this period of remote learning and support, NOVA is committed to ensuring that you receive the highest level of support needed. For the most updated information on NOVA’s response to COVID-19, please check the COVID-19 webpage regularly for updates. https://www.nvcc.edu/coronavirus/index.html You should also visit our college Remote Student Services Page if you need further assistance or download their PDF guide HERE.

If you need to speak with someone regarding a Student Service issue, please contact the Medical EducationCollege-Resource-List-for-Remote-Student-Services Campus (MEC) Student Services Office at 703-822-6537 and press 0 to speak with a Student Service Representative or send an email to meccounselor@nvcc.edu.

The Medical Education Campus will have open walk-in hours via Zoom Monday to Friday from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM. Please use the Zoom link below to enter the virtual lobby. A staff member will assist you and connect you with an available advisor. If you are unable to meet with an advisor, we ask that you follow up with an email to MECCounselor@nvcc.edu to address your issue.

 

Click Here M-F 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM for the MEC Student Services Virtual Lobby

You can also Dial into the lobby using your phone with one of the numbers below. You will be asked for a meeting id when dialing in. The Meeting ID  is  703 822 6531East coast participants should use +1 646 558 8656 to dial in.

Dial by your location
+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 301 715 8592 US
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
+1 253 215 8782 US

If your local number isn’t on the list visit the zoom website to locate it, https://vccs.zoom.us/u/aczPzCNYVb 

An appointment request should be sent to meccounselor@nvcc.edu for times before or after scheduled walk-in hours.

If you have questions related to an application you have submitted or are attempting to submit, contact our application team at applymec@nvcc.edu. They will work towards resolving any difficulties you may encounter.


Available Resources at the Medical Education Campus

Remote Services Method of Contact
24 Hour Student Support Center

Questions related to:

·        College Admission

·       MEC Program Admissions

·       General Advising

·       Financial Aid Assistance

 

 

 

1-855-323-3199

IT Help Desk

Questions related to:

·       Password reset assistance

·       Technology-related issues

 

 

703-426-4141

Email Support Dean of Students

·       Emergency Assistance

·       Withdrawals for Mitigating Circumstance

                 mmckeithen@nvcc.edu

 

Email Support Enrollment Services

Questions related to:

·       Enrollment Verifications

·       Graduation Verifications

·       State Licensure Forms

 

 

 

MECEnrollment@nvcc.edu

 

Email Support Advising and Counseling

Questions related to:

·      Health Science and Nursing admission questions

·       General Advising

·       Change of Program Requests

 

 

https://blogs.nvcc.edu/mecexchange/

MECCounselor@nvcc.edu

Virtual Walk-In Advising with MEC Staff

Questions related to:

·       Health Sciences and Nursing admission questions

·       General Advising

 

 

 

Click Here M-F 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM for the MEC Student Services Virtual Lobby

Email Support Admissions

Questions related to:

·       Documents that need to be added to already-submitted Health Science and Nursing Applications

·       Problems regarding submission of Health Science and Nursing Application

 

 

 

ApplyMEC@nvcc.edu

Email Support Military and Veterans Services

Questions related to:

·       Veteran benefits

·       Military TA

 

 

veteranmilitaryservices@nvcc.edu

militaryservices@nvcc.edu

Email Support Disability Services

 Questions related to :

·       Intake, Memorandum of Accommodations,  Documentation, etc.

akallasalleva@nvcc.edu

disabilityservices@nvcc.edu

 

Email Support Virtual Advising Chat

Questions related to:

·       LIVE CHAT

academicadvising@nvcc.edu

https://www.nvcc.edu/virtualadvising/

Email Support Student Life

Questions related to:

·       Clubs and Organizations

·       Event cancellations

 

 

pmartinmattocks@nvcc.edu

Email Support MASON Advance

Questions related to:

https://www.nvcc.edu/advance/

advance@nvcc.edu

Email Support Campus Outreach

Questions related to:

•    Article submissions for The Pulse

Question regarding Campus and Community events

 

chouse@nvcc.edu

 

 

Questions related to general  NOVA information

www.nvcc.edu

Contact ACE the CHATBOT!

 

 


Please see the full list of available college resources below by campus

Virtual Advising

https://www.nvcc.edu/virtualadvising/index.html 

NOVA Online

NOVA Online Contact Form

Alexandria Campus

Student Services Office (Admissions & Registration)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/alexandria/stuservices/index.html
E-mail: ALCounseling@nvcc.edu

Advising & Counseling (incl. First Year Advising)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/advising/
E-mail: ALCounseling@nvcc.edu

Annandale Campus

Student Services Office (Admissions & Registration)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/annandale/stuservices/index.html
E-mail: ANEnrollment@nvcc.edu

Advising & Counseling (incl. First Year Advising)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/advising/
E-mail: ANCounseling@nvcc.edu
Location: CA Building Room 112
First-Year Advising E-mail: GPSAnnandale@nvcc.edu

Loudoun Campus

Student Services Office (Admissions & Registration)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/loudoun/stuservices/index.html
E-mail: LOANR@nvcc.edu
Advising & Counseling (incl. First Year Advising)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/advising/
E-mail: locounseling@nvcc.edu

Manassas Campus

Student Services Office (Admissions & Registration)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/manassas/stuservices/index.html
E-mail: maadmissions@nvcc.edu
Advising & Counseling (incl. First Year Advising)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/advising/
E-mail: macouns@nvcc.edu

Woodbridge Campus

Virtual Resources from Woodbridge Campus
Student Services Office (Admissions & Registration)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/woodbridge/stuservices/index.html
E-mail: N/A
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/advising/
E-mail: wocounseling@nvcc.edu

Medical Education Campus (MEC)

Student Services Office (Admissions & Registration)
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/medical/stuservices/index.html
Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/medical/apply
E-mail: meccounselor@nvcc.edu

Library

Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/library/campus.html

Alexandria

E-mail: library-al@nvcc.edu
Ask A Librarian (AL): https://nvcc.libwizard.com/f/AL-Email-

Annandale

E-mail: ANlibrary@nvcc.edu
Ask A Librarian (AN): https://nvcc.libwizard.com/f/Annandale-Email-a-Librarian

Loudon

Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/library/campus.html
E-mail: LO-Library@nvcc.edu
Ask A Librarian (LO): https://nvcc.libwizard.com/f/Loudoun-Email-Reference

Manassas

Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/library/campus.html
E-mail: malibrary@nvcc.edu
Ask A Librarian (MA): https://nvcc.libwizard.com/f/Manassas-Library-Email-Reference-Form

Medical Education Campus

E-mail: medlib@nvcc.edu
Ask A Librarian (MEC): https://nvcc.libwizard.com/f/MEC-Email-d

Woodbridge

Website: https://www.nvcc.edu/library/campus.html
E-mail: wolibrary@nvcc.edu
Ask A Librarian (WO): https://nvcc.libwizard.com/f/woemail

How to study smart, Not hard

Study smart, not hard – Take a break when you need a break:

If you’re feeling like you need a break from studying, don’t fall into the trap of thinking that you need to power through and keep cramming. You might think more = better, but studies have shown that taking a break can actually make you more productive.

Know your own learning style:

Many students may make it to the college-level without even knowing what their unique learning style is, but for sustained performance tailored to your receptors, it is critical to get acquainted with your learning preferences, i.e. verbal, visual, auditory, kinesthetic, spatial, etc.

Reward yourself:

Advice from a 26-year-old labor and delivery nurse Danielle Smith: Her biggest tip is to set rewards for studying. For example, she suggests that if you want to watch the new episode of “This is Us”, you should tell yourself you must first finish your flash cards for a chapter or complete at least 25 practice questions, etc.

“Other rewards could be a date/night out, or even a treat like your favorite candy bar, but not unless you accomplish something for school first,” Smith says. “This worked wonders for her!”

Avoid cramming:

Make sure you give yourself enough time to study all the content before your test! Cramming is never good. You should normally start studying a week before your class and always do a little bit every day, no matter what. You MUST get into the habit of using a planner, so you know exactly when your assignments and tests are due, and pen in study time, chores, leisure, etcetera on your calendar to hold yourself fully accountable! Another tip is to do a lot of practice questions. That’s helped many students immensely in knowing how to answer questions on their Board exams. Amidst the stress, I must emphasize the need for self-care.

Schedule that study time:

Second-year nursing student Kelly Carson, 25, says that time management and prioritizing are everything. And the real key? Scheduling out a time to study—don’t just leave it until you feel like it.

The assignments are never ending so make sure you have a place whether it’s on the computer or an old fashion planner to write down your assignments for the entire semester. Also, getting a head start at the beginning of the semester will help you to not get behind on readings and assignments!

 

Diffuse oils for concentration:

If you need a little pick-me-up before studying, try some essential oils. Lavender, rosemary, and peppermint oils have all been studied and have been shown to increase concentration and retention. Try diffusing the oils or dabbing a little on your wrists before sitting down to a study session.

For music aficionados, the “Mozart effect” cannot be underestimated. Works by Bach, Brahms, Mozart and others are effective aids that improve sleep patterns and reduce stress, studies find. As the season of cramming and finals approaches, you can get help with a healthy, easily accessible study aid — classical music. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyiEv7khrH0&app=desktop (best music for concentration and study alpha waves mp3 download)

Try the 45-15 study strategy:

If you’re having trouble focusing on your study sessions, try mixing things up with the 45-15 study strategy. The strategy is simple: set a timer for 45 minutes, then take a break for the next 15. The key is really, really focusing during those 45 minutes (no social media, folks!) and then really, really taking a break. Get up, get moving, talk a walk, and then get back to it. The strategy is a good way to prep and take advantage of the natural ebb and flow of concentration in your brain.

Create a study ritual:

Pay attention to how you feel when you sit down to study—are you dreading it before you even begin? Groaning internally? Exhausted just thinking about it? It may be time to re-evaluate your study environment. There is no reason to make study time something you absolutely hate; instead, try to set up little rituals for yourself before and while you study to make it more enjoyable. Try setting up a special corner, lighting a candle or even stashing your favorite snacks nearby for a little treat. And on the flip side, if you’re a creature of habit while studying, you could also try mixing up your environment. Get out of your house or apartment and visit a new coffee shop or deli to get some new sights and sounds while you study.

Don’t study solo:

Just like nurses and healthcare workers out in the field depend on their coworkers to survive, so too do nursing and healthcare students. You develop an odd little family with your peers because you are together more than anyone else. Find a few people who you mesh well with, this is what will get you through nursing school. Support each other, encourage, and hold each other accountable.

Use each other to study, quiz, vent, give a different perspective and discuss how nursing school is affecting your family life, and you as an individual. People who have never experienced nursing school cannot relate to what you’re going through. The stress, demands, assignments, working for free, being away from your family, and when you are home, doing nothing but read or study. These guys will know exactly how you feel because they are going through it, too. Many students couldn’t have done it without their nursing crew.”

Prep before class:

Chances are, your typical study style might look something like this: go to class, take notes, review the material, study, take test, right? Well, Shelby B., a second-year nursing student who runs the account @coffeeandcareplans has a different strategy that I think is genius. In an Instagram post on her page, she explains how she actually reviews the course material before class so she knows exactly what to listen for during the lecture and is even more prepared to get clarity on the concepts she needs more help with.

 

 

Do I Need SDV 101?

Current Application page: http://www.nvcc.edu/medical/apply

FAQ

I am reading some of the evaluations of my SDV 101 faculty and some students will make the comment that they have already taken SDV 100-College Success Skills.

The following students are exempt from taking SDV 101 for program admission:

  • You have already taken SDV 100 or another SDV course at NOVA
  • You have transferred in an SDV elective from another college (verified by NOVA transcript evaluation)
  • You have a transferrable associates degree or higher from a U.S. college or university (verified by NOVA transcript evaluation)
  • You have passed the NOVA SDV ABLE Examination

All first-time college students interested in MEC are encouraged to take SDV 101 within their first 16 credits at NOVA.  You can take the course on MEC campus or online through NOVA Online.

The SDV course is centered on college success skills.  Often students misinterpret the 101 courses to be Health Science 101 or Nursing 101.  The discipline is STUDENT DEVELOPMENT.  The learning outcomes are the same as SDV 100 courses but we adjust our instruction, textbook, and assignments to students who are interested in healthcare careers.

You have the opportunity to learn more about MEC admissions if you take the SDV 101 course.  You can also experience the campus environment and some facilities if you take the in-person courses in Springfield.

Needs

To survive and thrive we all need:

Food

Shelter

Hope

The pressure to succeed and move on with their life is a very real thing for our Health Science and Nursing students at the Medical Education Campus (MEC and across Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA).  For some, their time at NOVA is the bridge between a difficult life and a comfortable one. For others, NOVA is a low-risk environment to explore an interest or a jumpstart their bachelor’s degree. Whatever the need, NOVA stands ready to help students along their path.

Each student’s personal narrative is different and the path unique. Staff and Faculty at the MEC realize this and have taken strides to alleviate some of the non-academic pressures a student may face. Nationally 1 in 3 undergraduate students faces food insecurity issues[1]. At NOVA our students also face these issues on their pathway to success. Our Student Life Office (HE116) under the direction of Patricia Martin-Mattocks and her excellent staff, maintain a food pantry to assist students. Their office is a central hub of student engagement on campus, promoting cross-discipline activities and leadership opportunities for our students. Any student facing food insecurity should reach out to her without hesitation.

NOVA also operates a Financial Stability Program[2] that can help students with:

      • Child Care Services

      • Energy Assistance (Fuel, Crisis, or Cooling)

      • Food Assistance (SNAP)

      • Health Care Coverage

      • Temporary Cash Assistance

      • Legal Assistance

      • Immigration Assistance

      • Emergency Cash Assistance

      • Employment Assistance

      • Clothing Assistance

      • AND MUCH MORE.

Students should log into nvcc.singlestoptechnologies.com to see their eligibility for financial assistance[3].

In addition to our food pantry, NOVA is committed to the success and well-being of her students. The office of NOVACARES[4] has reporting tools that allow individuals to inform the college if they or someone they know is having difficulties or has been a victim of sexual assault. Reports are confidential and handled by trained staff who will decide on the appropriate response.

Please know that we are here as guides and mentors along your path. Students are our greatest credential and source of pride.

Sincerely,

MEC Counselor

[1] https://blogs.nvcc.edu/spotlight/2018/02/15/food-insecurity-vol-01-iss-01/
[2] https://blogs.nvcc.edu/wssn/resources-services/virginia-commonhelp/
[3] https://blogs.nvcc.edu/wssn/resources-services/virginia-commonhelp/
[4] https://www.nvcc.edu/novacares/

 

What’s “Mindset” got to do with it?

Register: https://mindsetmattersalways.eventbrite.com

What’s “Mindset” Got to do with it?

Vicky Krug is an Associate Professor of College Literacy, Psychology, Critical Thinking and Freshman Experience at Westmoreland County Community College and the Community College of Allegheny County. Her most recent graduate degree is from the Johns Hopkins University, School of Education in Mind, Brain and Teaching. She is currently pursuing another Masters from Hopkins; this one in Liberal Arts. She has studied at Seton Hill University, The University of Pittsburgh, California University and Boston University in Education; Social Work, Psychology and Neuroeducation. She enjoys bicycling, kayaking, traveling, reading, learning and being with people. With advances in technology, neurological research findings, and ever-increasing diversity of our population, life seems ever more complex. Teaching, learning, leadership and living life can be improved and enhanced if we have the appropriate “Mindset”.

Topic: What’s “Mindset” Got to do with it?

Light refreshments to be served.


MEC ACADEMIC SUCCESS TUTORING CENTER SCHEDULE SPRING 2019

MEC Tutoring Center

 

  • All face-to-tutoring sessions will be held at the Tutoring Center in room 106 unless otherwise indicated.
  • All online tutoring sessions will be held via the link from the appointment slot. If you choose an online session, from your computer/device, click on the link approximately 5-10 minutes before the start of your session. Then, open the appointment and click on the “Meet Me” link to start the session with your Tutor. Note: Online drop-in hours end at posted end time! If you log-in one minute before the end of the session time, you will have one minute with the Tutor accordingly.
  • You can schedule an appointment no more than 14 days in advance.

QUESTIONS?  Please contact Kathleen Odigé, Academic Success Center Coordinator at kodige@nvcc.edu

SPRING 2019_new (003)


TUTOR SUBJECTS TUTORED MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
Arturo PTH Courses ·         10A-12P, (Walk-In)

·         12-2P (By Appointment)

Bill EMS-Basic ·         2-5P  (Walk-in)

 

1-5P (By Appointment)
Dasha 1st-year DNH courses, DNA courses ·         4-7P (Walk-in) ·         7-8A  (By Appointment)

·         4-7P (By Appointment)

·         4-6P (By Appointment)
Dereje BIO 141-142, CHM 111-112, Statistics, 1st year RAD courses ·         6-9P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment) ·         4-5P (By Appointment) ·         6-9P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment) ·         3-5P (Group, By Appointment)
Jana Coding courses ·         4-6P  (Walk-in)

·         6-7P (By Appointment)

Lwam 1st year RTH courses ·         9A-12P (Walk-in)

·         12-1P (By Appointment)

·         9A-1P (By Appointment)
Marley OCT courses ·         5-8P ( Online on a computer~  Drop-in) ·         5-6P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment) ·         5-8P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment) ·         5-8P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment)
Maryam MDL courses, MTT-Pre-Calculus, BIO 141-142 ·         1-3P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment)
Nancy Effective Communication in Healthcare, Study Skills, General TEAS guidance, Writing ·         10A-2P(Walk-in) ·         10A-2P(Walk-in) ·         10A-2P(Walk-in) ·         10A-2P(Walk-in)
Narges 1st-year DNH courses, DNA courses ·         4-8P (By Appointment) ·         4-7P (Walk-in) ·         7-8P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment) ·         3-6P (Group in HE 329) (Walk-in)
Nelly MDL courses ·         7-9P  ( Online on a computer~  By appointment)
Sharmeen ACC 211, ECO 202, HIM 111, HIM141-142, HIM 200, HIM220, MTT, MTH 154, Writing ·         1-4P (Walk-in) ·         10A-4P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment) ·         10A-9P 10A-9P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment) ·         10A-9P 10A-9P ( Online on a computer~  By appointment)

 

Career Corner Sept 2019

Carry out a random act of kindness, with no expectation of reward, safe in the knowledge that one day someone might do the same for you. Princess Diana

Creating Your Brand

Personal branding is creating a professional and personal reputation. How you want people to see you as a person and a colleague. It helps bring to light your goals and how you will achieve them as a person.

Employees will google you, they will build an image of you online, resume, phone interview, ad in-person interview

  1. Determine your emotional appeal
    • How do I make people feel?
    • How would someone describe me?
    • Make a list of words to describe you.
  2. Determine your description of what or who your brand is for
    • What industry (e.g. healthcare)
    • Target Market (look for common terms used in your specific field)
  3. Determine your function what do you do
    1. What transferable skills/skills do you have to bring to the position.
  4. Put it all together to create your professional summary
How to begin to prepare for job placement now

Journal Writing

will not only help you reflect on your day, but will also help gather your experiences to draw from when interviewing.

Soft skills in Healthcare:

Empathy, communication, team player, strong work ethic, positivity, and flexibility are all needed in the healthcare industry. While on clinical you will need to shine in these skills.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/healthcare-importance-soft-skills-dan-hobson-healthcare-recruitment-

How to Get the Most from an Advising Session

FAQ

Most advising sessions begin with a simple question, how may I assist you today? Another common question is, what do you want to get out of NOVA? We want to know what purpose NOVA serves in your life and academic plans. This can convert a conversation from a recitation of the facts, to an exploration of your goals and avenues for growth and improvement.

Before contacting our office, or visiting we encourage you to become an active stakeholder in your future. Take the initiative and do your research. A successful student tends to be the one who is organized and anticipates their next step. In short, you must mise en place your academic life. The more research and preparation you do, the more you can get out of a visit with an advisor or counselor. Below are some tips to help you get the most of your session.

Know your NOVA ID/EMPLID number

Having your ID number or better yet your NOVA Card is an indispensable tool. Not only can you use it around campus it speeds up pulling up your account.

When possible write your questions down in a bulleted list

Writing your questions down provides a framework that ensures your questions are answered. Due to time constraints and the fact that there is a lot to go over, an advisor may not be able to cover everything in detail about a program. Your bulleted list signals to the advisors that you’ve done your initial research. This allows the advisor to focus on what you specialty don’t know or are in need of clarification.

  1. How do I transfer Credits
  2. What are the entry requirements for…
  3. How can I satisfy the math placement requirement

Bring your official external transcripts.

Students often ask us what courses they have left to take. While we encourage you to bring your external transcripts, we are not able to give you a list of courses that will or will not transfer. In some cases, a student can know what will transfer by visiting the College Records Office website and utilize their transfer guide. Preferably this would have been done before your visit to the office. If you have already transferred courses to NOVA, you should review your transfer credit center and compare the transferred courses to your program requirements.

Take Notes

You’ve done your research, brought transcripts if applicable and wrote your questions down. Your next step is to take notes during your visit. We generally have scrap paper and pens on hand for you to use. However, it is best that you keep a notebook, or note app on your smartphone at the ready. Again the more organized you are the more likely you are to succeed.

Ask Extra Questions

If something an advisor has said isn’t clear, ask again. Always ask for clarification if you don’t understand. Remeber that an advising session is a conversation, so its ok to go off script.

Follow Up

Part of being the advocate of your own destiny is being proactive. Take charge and constantly investigating options, program requirements and areas of improvement are wholly your responsibility. Checking in at least once a semester is ideal, especially if you are applying to a program more than a year out.

Things Change

Program changes can occur often with little warning. As such you must be vigilant and ready to act. When possible our office reaches out to students via email or on our blog and facebook pages, but it is impossible to inform everyone. When changes occur a student may feel frustrated, often because a course or courses are no longer required or used by a program. This is normally an issue when students are planning to join a program two or three years down the line. You will need to carefully weigh the risk of program changes when starting on an extended academic plan. this may require that you try and start a little sooner.

We hope that you get the most out of your interaction with our advising staff. As always feel free to send your questions and we will work to answer them as quickly as possible.