Tag Archives: mental health

Tip of the Week: Red Flags within a Relationship

Do you know the expression “love is blinding”? This is a true statement. Even when your gut is telling you that something is wrong, you often ignore it. However, your gut is never wrong. Here are some red flags to look out for when in a relationship:
• Blames others for own faults
• Drug/ Alcohol use/abuse
• Explosive temper
• Extreme jealousy or insecurity
• Fascination with weapons
• Strong gender stereotypes
• Difficulty with authority
• Cannot express emotions verbally
• Treats partner like property/possession
• Isolates you from friends and family
• Blows up about little things
• Thinks it’s okay to resolve conflict with violence
• Checking emails, cellphones and social media without permission
• Constantly insulting or putting down partner and/or humiliating partner in public or in front of loved ones

If you or someone you know sees the warning signs in their relationship, then remember you are not alone and that you have the option to seek help. You can always reach out by contacting NOVA Sexual Assault Services (SAS) directly at nova.sas@nvcc.edu or 703-338-0834.
https://www.nvcc.edu/novacares/sas/dating.html
If you would like to learn more about this topic, join us for our Red Flag Campaign on Monday, March 2nd from 11am to 2pm in the LC Café on the Loudoun Campus. Hope to see you there! https://www.facebook.com/events/166424331470492/

Tip of the Week: 5 Ways to Start a Mental Health Conversation with Your College Kids Over the Holidays. Shared by our friends at “This is My Brave”.

Five Ways to Start a Mental Health Conversation with your College Kids Over the Holidays

Five Ways to Start a Mental Health Conversation with your College Kids Over the Holidays

Hayley B. Sherwood, Ph.D.

Articles in the news media and online are aplenty during the holiday season, full of advice for coping with stress, difficult relationships, grief, and a host of other challenges. For parents with college students, the next several weeks is often one of the few times of the year that their children are home for an extended period of time. According to statistics on ActiveMinds.org, 39% of college students experience a significant mental health issue, and suicide is the second leading cause of death among this population.

As college students wrap up exams and return home, the long holiday break can be a good time to open up a discussion about mental health. Here are several ways to start a conversation:

1. Ask questions (without badgering!). Find time to inquire about self-care habits. How much sleep are they getting and how well are they sleeping? How is their diet? Have they gained or lost a significant amount of weight? Are they improving or at least maintaining their grades? What are they doing to relax? Are they managing their time well? Are they feeling connected to roommates and classmates? Is exercise part of their routine? Are they participating in any clubs or other extra-curricular activities?

2. Be honest. As your children reach young adulthood, share family mental health histories with them. Just as we discuss our family’s physical issues, like cancer or diabetes, many older teens need to hear about family addiction, depression, anxiety, psychosis, and other issues for which they might be at risk. These conversations can be uncomfortable. However, young adults in their late teens and early twenties are most vulnerable to serious mental illness, especially when those related to them have been diagnosed. For example, informing your children that addiction runs in the family might just alert them that excessive use of things like alcohol, drugs, video games, porn, or spending could lead to more self- destructive choices or long-term consequences down the road. Talk with your children about more adaptive ways of coping with stress.

3. Be a resource. Let your child know you support them in finding mental health help in college and in the college community. Most colleges have counseling and/or learning centers that offer individual and group services for a range of issues. Offer to assist in identifying mental health resources online, as well as on- and off-campus. If your child is struggling academically or has a history of receiving school-based support prior to college, consulting with staff in their college Office of Disability Services could lead to accommodations in the classroom. As legal adults, college-aged children must take the lead in seeking out these services, but parents can also encourage their child, along with track down paperwork or reach out for guidance from therapists or other professionals who may have supported their child in high school.

4. Equip. Think about offering your college students free or inexpensive apps that help ease stress and/or cope with a variety of mental health conditions, including Happify, Insight Timer, Calm, Breathe2Relax, Sanvello and What’s Up, as well as MindShift (anxiety), Recovery Record (eating disorders), Panic Relief (panic disorder), Twenty-Four Hours A Day (addiction) and eMoods (bipolar disorder).

5. Keep in touch. As your children prepare to return to college, especially if they are struggling with a mental health issue,
establish a plan for staying in regular contact. Setting aside time for a call or Facetime, not just texting,
allows parents to hear their children’s voice, which is a better way to see how they are feeling.

Taking the time to connect and engage in these vital conversations over the holidays can make a huge difference in how your young adult learns to prioritize and manage their mental health.

About the Author:

Dr. Sherwood is a Board Member of This Is My Brave, as well as the Owner and Clinical Psychologist of Oak Hill Psychological Services, PLLC, in Herndon, Virginia. She specializes in adolescent, women’s and family issues.

Tip of the Week: Dealing with Depression

Depression is a mental disorder that causes a constant feeling of sadness, tiredness, and loss of interest. Depression affects how you feel, think, and behave and can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems. You may have trouble doing normal day-to-day activities, and sometimes you may feel as if life isn’t worth living. Depression can be treated, so it’s important to seek help if you believe you may be experiencing depression. To learn more, go to https://www.nvcc.edu/novacares/resources.html

 

 

Tip of the Week: Signs of Depression

Signs of Depression
Depression is a common mood disorder that can affect a person’s feelings, thoughts and body. People occasionally do feel sadness but it’s only for a brief time. With depression, it’s constant and it can interfere with your everyday life.
Experiencing signs of depression? If you think you are depressed then remember you are not alone and that you have the option to seek help. You can always reach out to NOVACares by filling out the NOVACares report.
http://www.nvcc.edu/novacares
People with depression may experience:
o Loss of interest
o Hopelessness
o Irregular sleep
o Concentration problems
o Feelings of guilt
o Insomnia
o Fatigue
o Weight loss or weight gain
o Suicidal thoughts
o Mood swings
o Constant sadness
o Restless sleep


For more information go to:
https://www.jedfoundation.org/
https://www.healthyplace.com/

Tip of the Week: 3.27.17 Counseling Referrals

Although Northern Virginia Community College does not provide campus-based mental health services for students, NOVACares has created a database of mental health professionals available throughout the Northern Virginia, DC, Maryland area who are licensed to provide psychotherapy and medication management. Our Mental Health Provider Database allows you to search for a provider by discipline, specialty, gender identification, insurances accepted, location and public transportation accessibility. The Mental Health Provider Home Page also includes information about how to choose a therapist and offers information and resources for addressing grief, substance abuse, veterans’ concerns and LGBTQ support. For more information about The Mental Health Provider Home Page, please click the following link http://nvcc.rints.com/. To find more about available NovaCares services, visit us at www.nvcc.edu/novacares/resources.html

.

Mental Health First Aid Training, 2 Days: Oct. 8-9 Register now in NOVA Academy

Greetings!

 

The Office of Student Mental Health and Behavior and the Professional Development Unit (HR) have invited the Fairfax County Community Services Board once again to facilitate the Mental Health First Aid workshop.

 

Location: Fairfax, 3922 Pender, Suite 150

Date: Wednesday, October 8th and Thursday, October 9th.

Time:  9:30 am-till 3:00 pm.

Note: Participants need to commit to both days and be present for the duration of the sessions to receive their certification.

Maximum number of participants: 20

Registration closes on Tuesday, September 30th at midnight, so sign up now!

 

Course Title:

NOVA – HR: Mental Health First Aid 

 

Course Description:

You are more likely to encounter someone experiencing a mental health crisis than someone having a heart attack. Mental Health First Aid is an interactive 8-hour course that teaches you about common warning signs and risk factors for mental health problems and provides a five-step action plan and resources for helping someone in crisis. Mental Health First Aid provides an overview of mental illness and substance use disorders and introduces participants to risk factors and warning signs of mental health problems, builds understanding of their impact, and gives an overview of common treatments. Those who take the 8 hour course certify as Mental Health First Aiders and learn a 5-step action plan encompassing the skills, resources and knowledge to help an individual in crisis connect with appropriate professional, peer, social, and self-help care.

 

Please register through NOVA Academy for this class at https://covkc.virginia.gov/nvcc.  Search for keyword “nova health.”  You may contact AskHR@nvcc.edu if you have any additional questions.

 

Thank you,

 

Human Resources

Northern Virginia Community College

3926 Pender Drive, Suite 150

Fairfax, VA 22030-0974

 

http://www.nvcc.edu/

 

In light of Robin Williams’ Passing – Here is some info on helping those struggling with depression

CrisisLink – You Talk, We Listen.

 

Recognize the Signs of Suicidal Behavior

Things People Might Say…

 

  • “I’m tired of life. I can’t go on.”
  • “My family would be better off without me.”
  • “Who cares if I’m dead anyway?”
  • “I just want out.”
  • “I won’t be around much longer.”
  • “Soon you won’t have to worry about me.”
  • “I wish I were dead.”
  • “I’m going to end it all.”
  • “I just want to die.”
  • “I’m going to kill myself.”
  • “If….doesn’t happen, I’m going to kill
    myself.”

Things People Might Do…

 

  • Get a gun or stockpile pills
  • Give away prized possessions
  • Take more impulsive risks
  • Cut themselves or other gestures of self-harm
  • Neglect their appearance
  • Abuse alcohol and/or drugs
  • Isolate themselves/run away/drop out of school
  • Show a dramatic change of mood

 

In Light of Robin Williams’WarningSigns Passing  – Here is some info from Crisis Link on helping those struggling with depression.  NOVACares!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOVA Victims’ Rights Provisions

Northern Virginia Community College

Victims’ Rights Provisions – 2014

 

Sexual misconduct is not tolerated at Northern Virginia Community College.  Reports of sexual assault, dating/domestic violence, or stalking are taken seriously.  It is important to NOVA that victims (complainants) are informed, protected, and respected.  The complete Northern Virginia Community College Sexual Misconduct Policy is available online at www.nvcc.edu.  More information about the College’s responsibilities under Title IX to address complaints of sexual violence can be found online.

The following rights are afforded to any NOVA student, staff, or faculty member who experiences such an incident.  It is NOVA’s hope that these rights will provide you with adequate information from which to choose your options.

  1.  CONFIDENTIALITY. Above all, confidentiality of victims must be protected.  Identifying information of a victim will be protected as much as possible.  This means that a victim’s name will not be published or otherwise publicized without her/his permission.  When a person makes an official complaint to authorities, all possible protections will be afforded this individual, whether or not she/he participates in any investigation. When the College needs to act to protect the safety of others, absolute confidentiality may not be possible. For absolute confidentiality, contact NOVA Sexual Assault Services (see below for contact information).
  2.  TIMELY WARNINGS.  Any timely warning that is broadcast through NOVA websites or emails for the safety of our community will       not identify a victim by name.
  3.  REPORTING OPTIONS.  It is your choice whether or not you decide to report your victimization. At NOVA, there are several offices to report an incident if you choose to do so.  See list below.College Police – 703-764-5000To report the incident and begin a criminal investigation

    Local Police Department – 911

    To report the incident and begin a criminal investigation with minimal college involvement

    Campus Dean of Students – Contact the Dean Of Students at your own campus or center

    To report the incident and begin a Student Code of Conduct investigation

    Human Resources – 703-323-3110

    To report the incident and begin a staff or faculty investigation

    Sexual Assault Services – nova.sas@nvcc.edu or 703.338.0834    24 hour availability

    ***To access confidential support, advocacy and intervention for those affected by these issues

    Title IX Coordinator – Mr. Therman Coles – 703-323-3266

    To report the incident and begin an administrative Title IX investigation

  4. NO CONTACT or PROTECTIVE ORDERS.  The College will honor any protective order that you may have acquired through the local courts.  Please bring a copy of such a court order to the College Police for their information and enforcement.  In addition, a NOVA administrative no contact order may be created by the Dean of Students or Title IX Coordinator once the incident is reported to that office.
  5. PRESERVING PHYSICAL EVIDENCE.  If you are considering a criminal prosecution, it is extremely important to preserve all evidence of an assault. If you go to a hospital as a result of a penetrating sexual assault, you are entitled to a free evidence collection examination called a SANE exam.  SANE stands for Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner.  In Northern Virginia, the preferred hospital for such an exam is INOVA Fairfax, where they have specially trained nurses on call 24 hours a day for such purposes. INOVA Fairfax Hospital provides care to sexual assault victims no matter where in Northern Virginia the crime occurred. The nurse will collect the evidence and ask the police in the jurisdiction where the crime occurred to pick it up and store it for at least six months.  The evidence will be in a box marked only with a number, not your name.  You are not required to make an official police report for this evidence to be collected.  If you later decide to make such a report, the hospital will give your name to the police and the evidence kit will be tested for possible use in a court case.  For more information about how to preserve evidence, contact NOVA Police at 703.764.5000 or NOVA Sexual Assault Services at 703.338.0834.
  6. STUDENT CONDUCT PROCESS.  If you are a student and your perpetrator was also a student, then you may choose to report the incident (as the complainant) to your Dean of Students to begin a conduct process.  This is not a court trial; you may or may not choose to contact the police to use this process.  A hearing will be held on campus to determine whether the perpetrator is responsible for the act that you have reported.  Sanctions for this process are confined to the College only and range from probation to expulsion, depending on the severity of the incident.  For more details, see the current NOVA Code of Student Conduct within the NOVA Student Handbook, accessed online or in hardback copy.
  7. HUMAN RESOURCES PROCESS.  If you are an employee, then you may choose to report the incident to NOVA Human Resources, specifically to the Director of Human Resources, Employee Relations Specialist or the designated HR Campus Consultant.  Additionally, you may also choose to contact College Police to use this process or to begin a criminal investigation.
  8. REQUESTS FOR CHANGES.  You may request a change in academic setting (class or campus) or work assignment in order to be more clearly separated from the accused perpetrator.  Such a request will be granted to the greatest extent possible.  These requests should be made to the Campus Dean of Students or Title IX Coordinator (if you are a student) or the Director of Human Resources or Title IX Coordinator (if you are an employee).  Requested changes will be made as soon as alternative arrangements can reasonably be made and regardless of whether you choose to pursue an investigation into your incident..
  9. FAIR AND IMPARTIAL INVESTIGATION AND RESOLUTION.  You can expect a fair and just process as your complaint is handled, either through the Dean of Students, Human Resources, or Title IX Coordinator.  You can obtain more information about these processes by accessing the Student Handbook, Faculty Handbook or Classified Staff Handbook, which can all be found online at www.nvcc.edu.
  10. RETALIATION CONCERNS.  Threats, intimidation, and any form of retaliation for bringing a complaint of sexual misconduct are prohibited by the Sexual Misconduct Policy as well as Federal law and may be grounds for disciplinary action.  If any retaliation occurs, it is important to contact either the Campus Dean of Students, the College Police, the Title IX Coordinator, and/or Human Resources.
  11. COMMUNITY RESOURCES.  Since NOVA does not offer mental health counseling to students or employees, it is important to be aware of community resources that are both free and confidential. All offer 24 hour services.  It is best to choose the service listed below that is closest either to your home or your campus.  Every student or employee can use NOVA SAS, however, no matter where you live, work, or study.

NOVA CC- Sexual Assault Services  (SAS)– nova.sas@nvcc.edu or 703.338.0834

ALEXANDRIA – Sexual Assault Center – 703.683.7273

FAIRFAX COUNTY  – Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS) – 703.360.7273

PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY – Sexual Assault Victims’ Advocacy Services (SAVAS) – 703.368.4141

LOUDOUN COUNTY – Abused Women’s Shelter (LAWS) – 703.777.6652

In an emergency, call 911.  Consider reporting any of these crimes to the police. 

NOVA Police can be reached at 703.764.5000.

Free On-Line Trainings “At Risk” for NOVA. Try them out!

Kognito is an FREE  interactive training for Faculty and Staff .  Through interactive conversation with student avatars, you can practice how to talk to students in distress and how to talk to and support our military students.   There is also a training for students on how to identify and talk to their peers who may be at risk.

The links to these trainings are below. The password to participate in these trainings is listed as well.  Please note that trainings are available on a first-come, first-serve basis, so please do not wait too long to participate.  Feel free to share this training opportunity with anyone you think may benefit.

 

At-Risk for Faculty & Staff

Website: http://www.kognitocampus.com/faculty

Enrollment Key: cspcva

 

At-Risk for Students

Website: http://www.kognitocampus.com/student

Enrollment Key: cspcva

 

Veterans on Campus

Website: http://www.kognitocampus.com/vet

Enrollment Key: cspcva

 

See the Signs: Help Stop Domestic Violence

1426245_10151841728380488_1768242224_nThis image is part of a campaign brought to you by the Avon Foundation for Women.

Domestic violence can affect anyone, regardless of gender identity, sexual orientation, income, race, ethnicity or religion – and many often blame themselves. 1 in every 7 men and 1 in every 4 women are physically abused by a partner (CDC, 2010). Share this post & help your friends #SeeTheSigns.