Tag Archives: NOVACares

NOVA’s First Annual “Take Back The Night” Rally and March April 22, LO

Take Back the Night Flyer 2014

NOVA’s First Annual Take Back the Night  is scheduled at the Loudoun Campus on Tuesday, April 22nd beginning at 6:30 PM.

The purpose of a Take Back The Night is to raise awareness about violence against women, specifically sexual assault and domestic violence.  There will be speakers from within the College and from the wider community.  Some students will speak out about their personal experiences.  Resources will be available from many community agencies.  The rally will be followed by a short candlelight march around LO (to invigorate the crowd and to add a special significance to the event.  And finally, Sexual Assault Services will provide an open area for those in attendance to share their experiences in a Safe Room at LO.

This entire event has been organized and is sponsored by NOVA Sexual Assault Services.  We welcome your attendance.  Please pass along the information to anyone you think might be interested.

 

Free On-Line Trainings “At Risk” for NOVA. Try them out!

Kognito is an FREE  interactive training for Faculty and Staff .  Through interactive conversation with student avatars, you can practice how to talk to students in distress and how to talk to and support our military students.   There is also a training for students on how to identify and talk to their peers who may be at risk.

The links to these trainings are below. The password to participate in these trainings is listed as well.  Please note that trainings are available on a first-come, first-serve basis, so please do not wait too long to participate.  Feel free to share this training opportunity with anyone you think may benefit.

 

At-Risk for Faculty & Staff

Website: http://www.kognitocampus.com/faculty

Enrollment Key: cspcva

 

At-Risk for Students

Website: http://www.kognitocampus.com/student

Enrollment Key: cspcva

 

Veterans on Campus

Website: http://www.kognitocampus.com/vet

Enrollment Key: cspcva

 

New Sexual Assault Services (SAS) Coordinator Joins NOVACares Team

Announcing a new addition to our team!

Please help us welcome Ms. Negar Ehsani to the NOVACares Team. Ms. Ehsani has accepted the Sexual Assault Services (SAS) Coordinator position. Negar has a Master’s of Social Work from George Mason University. She has experience from her position as Sexual Assault Outreach Specialist at the Fairfax County Office for Women and Domestic Sexual Violence Services. Negar comes to us with extensive community resource information for accessing community resources and programs in the NOVA area. Negar is bilingual (English and Farsi).

Negar, we are so happy that you have chosen to join the NOVACares team!

See the Signs: Help Stop Domestic Violence

1426245_10151841728380488_1768242224_nThis image is part of a campaign brought to you by the Avon Foundation for Women.

Domestic violence can affect anyone, regardless of gender identity, sexual orientation, income, race, ethnicity or religion – and many often blame themselves. 1 in every 7 men and 1 in every 4 women are physically abused by a partner (CDC, 2010). Share this post & help your friends #SeeTheSigns.

We Are Virginia’s Veterans NOVA Meeting Information

WE ARE VA VETS final

We Are Virginia’s Veterans

Alexandria: Monday 1000—1400 Conference Room: AA 195A
Annandale: Thursday 1300-1600 Room: CT 236
Loudoun: Tuesday 1300-1600 Room: LR 249A
MEC: 1st & 3rd Thursday 11:30-14:30 Room: 115, Pharm Lab
Manassas: Wednesday 1…3:00-16:00 Room: MP 325
Woodbridge: Wednesday 10:00-14:00 Downstairs Cafeteria
GOT A QUESTION?
Please contact: Ryan 571-235-8098 or Than 571-235-6583
VWWP Regional Office: 540-899-4399
VWWP Main Office: 877-285-1299

ASIST Training Opportunity Coming Soon! Save the Date!

SAVE THE DATE: ASIST training (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training) will be on January 8 & 9th at the Arlington Urgent Care Center Building, 601 S Carlin Springs Road, Arlington, VA 22204. It is conveniently located right off of Route 50. Registration information will be posted soon.

Veterans With Brain Injury Back to School Guide

http://www.dvbic.org/material/back-school-guide

Back to School Guide to Academic Success After Traumatic Brain Injury

The guide is for service members and veterans who have ongoing symptoms from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are going to college, university or vocational school. For multimedia content, click here.

Providers also can use this guide as a teaching tool to help their patients build a list of helpful contacts, track their progress and create a detailed schedule to manage their time. The frequently asked questions, or FAQ, sections quickly offer answers to common questions about accommodation plans, financial aid and assistive technology.

 

back to school

Did You Know? Cyber Abuse

October 8, 2013: Teen Dating Violence – Cyber Abuse

DVAM:

Did You Know?

 

Did you know that more than a quarter (26%) of youth in a relationship said they experienced some form of cyber dating abuse victimization in the prior year?

 

 

·         Nearly a fifth (18 percent) of all youth experienced cyber dating abuse.

 

·         Youth experienced cyber dating abuse at a rate that was comparable to that of physical dating violence, about half that of psychological dating abuse, and twice that of sexual coercion.

 

·         Females were twice as likely as males to report being a victim of sexual cyber dating abuse and/or sexual coercion in the prior year.

 

·         Male youth, on the other hand, reported significantly higher rates of all forms of physical dating violence victimization.

 

·         LGBTQ youth are particularly vulnerable to all types of teen dating violence/abuse and bullying, including cyber dating abuse and cyber bullying.

 

·         Few victims of any teen dating violence or abuse sought help after such experiences. Less than one out of ten victims reported seeking help, with half as many male victims as female victims seeking help.

 

*  Technology, Teen Dating Violence and Abuse, and Bullying: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/243296.pdf

 

What can we do?

The following suggestions were given by the researchers:

 

ü  Community Awareness

§  Raise awareness in the community & the schools about the harmfulness of perpetrating such acts and educate victims about the importance of reporting and seeking help.  These activities should include all members of the school and community, including principals, teachers, and peer leaders.

§  Schools can refer youth to programs and online resources, such as online forums for safely airing grievances and resolving disputes (see http://www.thatsnotcool.com/CalloutCards.aspx).

 

§  Because victims of teen dating violence and abuse and bullying victims are more likely to go to friends for help or advice, schools might consider creating peer-led groups to build awareness around the issues and create a comfort-level for victims to report.

 

§  In addition, since this research found that many help-seeking victims also reach out to their parents, it may be valuable for schools to help parents form support networks for each other, so that parents of victimized or vulnerable youth can share advice and resources regarding preventative measures. Likewise, schools could hold seminars and workshops for parents on how to identify and report when their child is being bullied or being abused via technology, and on how to help them cope with and address the issue.

 

ü  Targeted Outreach

§  Given the finding that so few youth victims of teen dating violence and abuse and bullying seek help, schools might create more formalized reporting mechanisms to ensure that such violence and abuse is being addressed effectively and promptly for both males and females. In particular, since less than half of male victims seek help, specific outreach efforts to male victims might be appropriate so that they can receive any needed assistance.

 

ü  Professional Education

§  Because so much of teens’ dating violence and abuse and bullying experiences occur at school, faculty and staff should be trained on how to identify signs of both types of acts and how to handle such incidences (e.g., when to report, to whom to report, how to report).

 Sandy Bromley writes: October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM)!  Each business day in October, we will send out a “DVAM: Did You Know?” highlighting interesting research findings and statistics or best practices in preventing and responding to domestic violence.   Please pass along this information to your colleagues, community groups, friends, and family members.  Speak out to end domestic violence in Fairfax County!