Tag Archives: suicide prevention

Tip of the Week: September 8 -14 is National Suicide Prevention Week

September 10th  is World Suicide Prevention Day! Let’s celebrate awareness! 1,100 of college students commit suicide every year, and 10% think seriously about suicide as an option. Many of us have either been personally affected by or know someone who has been affected by a suicide. It is important to remember you are NOT ALONE! If you or your friends express an interest in suicide, it is important to take it seriously! The best way to prevent suicide is to recognize these warning signs and know how to respond if you spot them. Here are some signs to look out for:
• Talking about wanting to die or to kill oneself
• Looking for a way to kill oneself
• Talking about feeling hopeless or having no purpose
• Talking about feeling trapped or being in unbearable pain
• Talking about being a burden to others; Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs
• Acting anxious, agitated, or reckless
• Sleeping too little or too much
• Withdrawing or feeling isolated
• Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge
• Displaying extreme mood swings.
For immediate help, please call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or for other resources visit:
https://afsp.org/find-support/
Or
https://www.nvcc.edu/novacares/resources.html

Tip of the Week: Suicide Prevention Tips

Tip of the Week: Suicide Prevention Tips: Look out for your friends. If someone you know is constantly making jokes about killing or harming themselves, it actually may be a serious cry for help. Behaviors that may be suicidal indicators include increased alcohol, drug, or prescription medication use, showing a disinterest in school and/or a job, withdrawal from activities that used to interest the person, a history of mental illness, and/or a recent traumatic event. These traumatic events can include a recent breakup, divorce, failed class or classes, a suspension/expulsion notice, losing a job, a sexual assault, and/or death of a peer or family member.

PRS Crisis Link Hotline is a local hotline that helps with suicide Northern Virginia. You can call the hotline at 703-527-4077 to talk to an empathic person who wants to help you or someone you know. The professionals provide free & confidential services 24/7. The hotline can also help you find referrals to mental health and other community services.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides free and confidential support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress 24/7 across the United States. Call: 1-800-273-8255
To know more about suicide prevention, visit us online https://www.nvcc.edu/novacares/resources.html

Tips on Suicide Prevention from NOVA Police.

http://www.nvcc.edu/police/_files/publicsafetynewsletter-September2016.pdf

According to a study released by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics
on April 22, 2016, suicide rates increased 24% between 1999 and 2014, the highest they have been in three decades. The greatest pace of increase came after 2006, and rates increased for both males and females of all ages 10-74. Females aged 10-14 and men aged 45-64 had the largest percent increases in suicide rates, 200% and 43% respectively. This troubling new data was released just days before the beginning of Mental Health Month, observed each May for over 60 years.

The new CDC report also confirms that “suicide among adolescents and young
adults is increasing and among the leading causes of death for those demographic groups.” Suicide continues to be a major concern on college campuses with issues of contagion and ideation at the forefront of challenges facing suicide prevention specialists. The statistics for college students are alarming:
 Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death among 18- to 24-year-olds.
 One in 10 college students has made a plan for suicide.
 There are more than 1,000 suicides on college campuses per year. This is approximately 100 times greater than the average number killed by active shooters on college campuses.
 Suicide contagion and clusters are more likely among young people in contained communities such as college campuses.
 The rate of suicide is between .5 and 7.5 per 100,000 among college students.
 Suicidal thoughts, making plans for suicide, and suicide attempts are higher among adults aged 18 to 25 than among adults over the age of 26.
 Thoughts of attempting suicide are reported to occur among 5% of grad students and 18% of undergrads.

Suicide prevention resources, addressing suicide prevention, information for suicide survivors, and help for friends in crisis in addition to other available counseling services, are available. Learn common misperceptions
about suicide and warning signs. Please share these resources, and others, with your campus community throughout Mental Health Month.
 Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention: Public-private partnership to advance the national strategy on suicide prevention
 American Association of Suicidology: Provides a college and university suicide prevention accreditation program in partnership with the Jed Foundation
 American Foundation for Suicide Prevention: Raises awareness, funds scientific research and provides resources and aid to those affected by suicide
 International Association for Suicide Prevention; A non-governmental organization in official relationship with the World Health Organization concerned with suicide prevention
 Jed Foundation: Promotes young adult emotional health and works to prevent suicide
 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Provides free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
 SAMSHA: Suicide Prevention: Provides suicide prevention information and other helpful resources to behavioral health professionals, the general public and people at risk
 Suicide Prevention Resource Center: Provides specific resources for colleges and universities in this section
of their website.

Free On-Line Trainings “At Risk” for NOVA. Try them out!

Kognito is an FREE  interactive training for Faculty and Staff .  Through interactive conversation with student avatars, you can practice how to talk to students in distress and how to talk to and support our military students.   There is also a training for students on how to identify and talk to their peers who may be at risk.

The links to these trainings are below. The password to participate in these trainings is listed as well.  Please note that trainings are available on a first-come, first-serve basis, so please do not wait too long to participate.  Feel free to share this training opportunity with anyone you think may benefit.

 

At-Risk for Faculty & Staff

Website: http://www.kognitocampus.com/faculty

Enrollment Key: cspcva

 

At-Risk for Students

Website: http://www.kognitocampus.com/student

Enrollment Key: cspcva

 

Veterans on Campus

Website: http://www.kognitocampus.com/vet

Enrollment Key: cspcva