Marketing Your Resume to Employers

Hiring managers get flooded with resumes for job openings. How can you ensure your resume will be looked at? Take some advice from hiring managers:

  • Do the basics.
  • Proofread for spelling, grammar, and tone. (Ask friends to proofread, too.)
  • Use a simple, easy-to-read typeface.
  • Follow instructions in the job posting. If the employer asks for information—such as references or writing samples—provide it.
  • If you’re applying by e-mail, your cover letter should be contained in the e-mail. If you’re applying online and there’s no space indicated for a cover letter, put your cover letter in the comments section.
  • Don’t let the informality of e-mail and text correspondence seep into your communications—whether e-mailed, online, or written—with potential employers.
  • Organize your resume for the employer—Organize your resume information in a logical fashion. Keep descriptions clear and to the point. As possible, tailor your resume to the job and employer, emphasizing skills, experiences, abilities, and qualifications that match the job description.
  • Customize your response—Address the hiring manager directly, if possible, and include the name of the company and the position for which it is hiring in your cover letter/e-mail response.
  • Make it easy for the hiring manager—Use your name and the word “resume” in the e-mail subject line so it’s easy to identify.
  • Focus on the skills and abilities you can bring to the employer, not what you want from the job—In your cover letter, answer the questions: What can you do to make the hiring manager’s life easier? What can you do to help the company? This is your opportunity to market yourself and stand out from the other candidates. Your resume should support that.
  • Be professional—Use a professional-sounding e-mail address or voice mail/answering machine message.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Calling all NOVA Gamers!

NOVA has developed a new varsity collegiate esports program to compete against other colleges nationwide!

We have built a new high-end esports arena on the Annandale Campus for the athletes to practice and compete in. The current varsity games include League of Legends and Overwatch. Aside from the varsity program, we will be having intramural esports with League of Legends and Overwatch as well as many other popular games such as Rocket League, Hearthstone, Rainbow Six, and a few others! For more information join our discord at https://discord.gg/JVmJd5M as well as our social media @NVCCEsports. Tryouts for our varsity program are right around the corner on December 19th, so sign up for a time slot fast at http://www.novaathletics.com/sports/esports/2018-19/releases/2019_Esports_Tryouts. For any other information or questions feel free to contact us through discord or email cgaul@nvcc.edu.  

Student Worker Needed

Have you been awarded Federal Work Study Aid? If you are using Financial Aid to pay for your courses and are interested in being a student worker next semester, NOVA Online’s Student Services Department is hiring!

More information can be found at: https://www.nvcc.edu/workstudy/index.html and https://nvcc.studentemployment.ngwebsolutions.com/jobxJobdetailPrint.aspx?JobId=10129&win=True

What to Do if You Don’t Have a Job at Graduation

Keep going! Be persistent in your job search. Get up every day as if you’re going to work, and spend time identifying and researching employers. Contact employers and schedule appointments. Make your job search your job!

Register. Sign up on job-search engines. Stay current and active on business networks like LinkedIn or social media sites like Facebook where you can find company profiles.

Work your network. Contact alumni in your field. Remind your contacts that you’re still looking for a job. Make new contacts by joining professional groups in your area.

Call on the career center. Even though you’ve graduated, your college’s career center is ready to help. Use all the online resources the career center offers.

Take a temp job. Temporary work will give you a way to pay your bills, and will help build the skills and experience that employers want. Plus, temp work will give you more contacts for your network, and may lead to a full-time job. Some organizations use temp positions as a stepping stone into full-time employment.

Get your foot in the door. Some employers offer internships to recent graduates. You may find part-time positions at a company for which you want to work. This could be effective, especially in an organization that hires from within. If you do a great job, you become an excellent candidate for a full-time position.

Look for ways to build new skills. Volunteer opportunities, like temp work, will open your network to new people and new opportunities. It can also help you develop new skills that will make you a more appealing job candidate.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Jobs and Internships Database for NOVA Students and Alumni

Trying to find an internship?  Looking for a job?  Whether you are near a computer or on the go, a great place to begin your search is by accessing the Jobs and Internships Database for NOVA students and alumni.

The following are some benefits of using the system.

  • Search for jobs and internships.  Take a look at many local positions available now.
  • Build a new resume with the Resume Builder feature.
  • Upload your resume and make it searchable to employers.
  • Check out over 1,000 career articles written by industry professionals.
  • View career videos and listen to over 25 career advice podcasts on topics including resume basics,  interviewing, and personal branding.
  • Browse and sign-up for upcoming workshops, programs, and events at NOVA and in the surrounding area.

Don’t delay – follow the steps below to begin using the system.

  1. Access the Jobs and Internships Database
  2. Select Students or Alumni
  3. Follow on screen instructions

 

Network For Your Job Search

Networking could be what helps you land a job.

If you take part in social networking sites, you probably have a pretty good idea of how networking can enhance your personal life. But, if you’re like many new college graduates, you’re probably not as comfortable about incorporating networking into your job search.

In spite of your discomfort, you need to incorporate networking into your job search: Especially in a competitive job market, networking could be what helps you land a job. In fact, many jobs are filled before they are even advertised—filled by people who learned about the opportunity before it was formally announced.

What is networking when it comes to the job search? It’s not about using people. Just as you look to build personal relationships through social networks, you want to build relationships to foster your professional life. These relationships can help you not only in your current job search but down the road as you build your career.

Networking is not one-sided: It works both ways. You offer assistance to others just as they offer assistance to you. Perhaps the easiest way to think about networking is to see it as an extension of being friendly, outgoing, and active.

Here are some tips for building and maintaining a healthy network:

  1. Make a list of everyone you know—and people they know—and identify how they could help you gather career information or experience.
    Who do you know at school? Professors, friends, and even friends’ parents can all be helpful contacts. Did you hold a part-time job? Volunteer? Serve an internship? Think about the people you came into contact with there.
  2. Sign up for an alumni mentoring program.
    Many colleges offer such programs, and they are a great way to build relationships in your field.
  3. Join the campus chapter of a professional society that relates to your career choice.
    In many ways, a professional society is an instant network: You’ll be with others who have the same general career interest. Plus, you may be able to learn more about your field from them. For example, you may be able to learn about the field and potential employers from others who share their internship experiences.
  4. Volunteer at a local museum, theater, homeless shelter—anywhere that even remotely relates to your field of study.
    By volunteering, you’ll not only learn about your chosen field firsthand, you’ll also be able to connect with people who are in the field.
  5. Speak to company representatives at career fairs, even if you’re not ready to look for a job.
    Be up front that you’re not currently in the job market and don’t take a lot of the representative’s time, but touching base with a potential employer now can help you down the road when you are ready.
  6. Attend company information sessions at your college and talk one-on-one to the recruiters who run them.
  7. Schedule informational interviews with people who can tell you about their careers.
    It’s best to ask to meet in person or by phone for a short interview, and don’t immediately start asking “How can you help me?” Plan your questions ahead of time, focusing on how the company works and how the person shaped his or her career path.
  8. Add your profile to LinkedIn.
    It’s free. And then, work your profile. Add work history (including internships!), skills, and keywords. Make connections to people you’ve worked with or met through networking. Ask for “recommendations” from people who have worked with you. You’ll find LinkedIn is a good source of suggestions for people in your field to contact for informational interviews.
  9. Remember to be courteous and tactful in all your conversations, to send thank-you notes to people who help you, and to find ways to help others as well.
    Don’t drop your network once you’ve gotten a job. Nurture the relationships you’ve built and look for opportunities to build new connections throughout your career. Getting started might be uncomfortable, but with time and practice, networking will be second nature.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

3 Ways to Celebrate National Career Development Day!

Work – Life – Balance

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy National Career Development Day!

Below are three things you can do to help celebrate the day.

  1. Participate in the Exploring Career Options webinar being offered today from 12:15 pm – 1:00 pm.  This 45 minute webinar will focus on using various online resources to research career options.  The relationship between programs of study at NOVA, college majors, and career options will be discussed.  Resources presented will provide information on nature of work, educational requirements, job outlook, and wages.  The webinar is free, but registration is required.  Learn more and register at https://nvcceli.wufoo.com/forms/exploring-career-options-fall-2018/.
  2. Access NOVA Online on Twitter to view today’s inspirational quote.  Follow us on Twitter for more quotes throughout the month.
  3. Visit NOVA’s Career Services website to learn more about career development.

Webinars to Help You with Your Academic and Career Planning

Do you need help with your academic or career planning?  If you answered yes to this question, you may find it helpful to participate in one or all of the following webinars:

Getting Ready for Your Next Semester

  • Wednesday, November 7, 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm
  • Thursday, November 8, 7:00 pm – 7:45 pm

This 45 minute webinar for NOVA students will focus on answering key questions students have about preparing for their next semester.  Topics covered will include program identification, course selection, college resources, schedule planning, and registration/payment tips.

Focus on Your Career Development

  • Wednesday, November 7, 12:15 pm – 1:00- pm

This 45 minute webinar will introduce students to FOCUS 2 an online, interactive, self-guided career and education planning system.  The system can help students select a program/major based on their interests and aspirations, discover occupations matching their personal preferences and attributes, map out their career plans – present and future, and make informed career decisions.

Exploring Career Options

  • Thursday, November 8, 12:15 pm – 1:00 pm
  • Wednesday, November 14, 12:15 pm – 1:00 pm

This 45 minute webinar will focus on using various online resources to research career options.  The relationship between programs of study at NOVA, college majors, and career options will be discussed.  Resources presented will provide information on nature of work, educational requirements, job outlook, and wages. 

Registration is required for each webinar.  Registration closes 15 minutes prior to the webinar start time.  Learn more and register at http://eli.nvcc.edu/webinars.htm.

National Career Development Month Begins Today!

November is National Career Development Month.  NCDM was designed to highlight the importance of life-long career development and the personal empowerment of all people.

Take time to focus on your career development by participating in the Focus on Your Career Development and Exploring Career Options webinars.   The Focus on Your Career Development webinar will be offered on Wednesday, November 7, at 12: 15 pm and the Exploring Career Options webinar will be offered on Wednesday, November 14, at 12:15 pm.  The goal of the webinars is to help you make informed decisions about your academic and career goals.    Registration is required.  Learn more about the webinars and register at http://eli.nvcc.edu/webinars.htm.

Learn more about career development on NOVA’s Career Services website.  Check NOVA’s Events calendar for information about other programs and events being offered throughout the month.

Follow NOVA Online (formerly ELife) on Twitter to receive a daily inspirational quote.   Read the NOVA Online student blog for tips, stories, and to stay connected.

What is the difference between a Guaranteed Admission and Articulation Agreement?

Guaranteed Admissions Agreements mean as a NOVA student, you are offered Guaranteed Admissions to a variety of four-year colleges and universities when you meet the requirements of the written Agreement between NOVA and that college. These Agreements guarantee admission to a college or university; but most do not guarantee admission to a specific program.

NOVA and the VCCS also have special articulation agreements with several four-year colleges and universities. These articulation agreements define the way courses, programs or entire categories of programs transfer to another institution and may include admission guarantees.

In order to be considered for guaranteed admission, a student must:
• Complete a transfer degree (A.A. or A.S.)
• Meet the minimum G.P.A. requirement
• Obtain a “C” or better in all applicable courses for their degree
• Take a minimum number of credits at NOVA (can be up to 15 credits)
• Some institutions require specific courses
• Complete a letter of intent, if needed

You can view the list of GAAs and AAs via NOVA’s transfer webpage. It is important to read the agreements carefully, so you know what specific requirements you will need to meet. View Guaranteed Admission Agreements webpage and check out the short video.

NOVA has also been working on developing easy to navigate transfer pathways to popular four-year Virginia colleges. It is always recommended that you view the four-year college’s transfer guide as well.

Want more information on transfer planning? Request a recording of the Transfer Planning Webinar!

Written by Kim Burkle, NOVA Online Counselor/Assistant Professor