Update: Esri Announces MOOC: Going Places with Spatial Analysis (Not an Intro!)

from www.directionsmag.com

An article in the latest ArcNews (Summer 2014, not online as I post) has further details:

  • The course will be run for the first time in September, with repeated offerings based on demand.
  • Esri will use the Udemy platform to deliver the course. Udemy allows individuals to offer an online course for free or fee. There are already a few GIS courses including one apparently from Esri.
  • The course is positioned as fulfilling a request of students of Penn States “Maps and the Geospatial Revolution” MOOC. They wanted an advanced course.
  • The course is expected to be the first in a series of MOOCs from Esri.

— original post June 23, 2014 —

Going Places with Spatial Analysis is a new online course, a MOOC, from Esri. There’s a video. Worth noting:

It’s not an intro course:

This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is for people who know something about data analysis and want to learn about the special capabilities of spatial data analysis. … Previous experience with GIS software is helpful, but not necessary for tech-savvy problem solvers.

Why should you take the course?

Spatial analysis focuses on location to gain a deeper understanding of data. Spatial analysis skills are in high demand by organizations around the world. You’ll get free access to the full analytical capabilities of ArcGIS Online, Esri’s cloud-based GIS platform.

No start date announced:

 

Sanborn Refreshes 3-D Digital Maps of Four Major U.S. Cities World’s Premier 3-D Building Database Now Includes Updated Coverage of Dallas, New York, Phoenix and San Francisco

www10.giscafe.com

Colorado Springs, Colo. (June 25, 2014)—The Sanborn Map Company announces a key upgrade to its world-class 3-D geospatial product line with updated coverage of the Dallas, New York, Phoenix and San Francisco metropolitan areas. Sanborn’s massive collection of highly accurate 3-D visualization digital data now covers the core downtown areas of nearly 70 major U.S. and international cities.

“Sanborn has the largest database of accurate 3-D cities available,” says Dave Lorenzini, 3-D industry expert. “The company’s commitment to update its coverage of these key metropolitan areas means more clients can access precision, off-the-shelf models and reap the affordable benefits of 3-D mapping today.”

Sanborn previously has completed large-scale production of 3-D datasets for major metropolitan areas such as Dubai, New Delhi and New York for proprietary customers. The company’s wide range of custom 3-D products offer a host of advantages for emergency response professionals, architects, engineers, real estate developers, urban planners, transportation managers, utility providers and more.

Sanborn creates its 3-D geospatial products by collecting high-resolution aerial imagery to construct highly accurate building footprints, 3-D building models, street centerlines and orthoimagery. The seamless, color-balanced imagery is available in 6-inch and 1-foot pixel resolution and, depending on the city, meets U.S. National Map Accuracy Standards.

In addition to its custom 3-D geospatial products, Sanborn offers CitySets, an off-the-shelf collection of 3-D data that leverages the company’s rich heritage by incorporating detailed building attributes derived from Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps® and field surveys.

View the entire CitySets product line comprising 3-D data for nearly 70 U.S. and international cities at http://www.sanborn.com/services/3dvisualization or e-mail a Sanborn sales professional at Email Contact.

Trimble Demonstrates Two New Concept Applications for Google’s Project Tango Program

www10.giscafe.com

SAN FRANCISCO, June 25, 2014 — (PRNewswire) — Trimble (NASDAQ: TRMB) showcased today two concept apps running on the latest tablet platform of Google’s Project Tango program, an initiative to give mobile devices a human-scale understanding of space and motion. The Trimble concept applications, SketchUp Scan and Trimble Through The Wall, demonstrate potential new ways construction professionals could use their Google tablets for greater efficiency and insight on the job in the future.

The concept apps were demonstrated at the Google I/O Developer Conference.

Using depth sensors on the Tango device, SketchUp Scan enables users to quickly capture a room, apartment or entire floor in 3D and automatically create an editable model. This model can be shared by email or on a variety of social networks, including Google+, Facebook and Twitter. The model also can be uploaded from the Tango device to the 3D Warehouse, Trimble’s platform for posting and sharing 3D models.

“Many 3D applications for smartphones and tablets attempt to capture the full scope of a room, but SketchUp Scan has the unique ability to create an editable 3D SketchUp model,” said Omar-Pierre Soubra, director of Collaboration at Trimble. “Having the ability to edit the 3D model of the space right after the image capture enables users to add features—from windows and doors, to furniture, office equipment or nearly anything else—using millions of 3D models available in the 3D Warehouse.”

Trimble Through The Wall leverages the tracking capabilities of Tango devices to reveal what is located inside walls and other structures. Using data from Computer-Aided Design (CAD) or 3D Building Information Modeling (BIM) software, such as Tekla Structures, Trimble Through The Wall can display and overlay pipes, electrical wires and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) infrastructure on top of walls, at their correct location.

“Trimble’s leadership in technologies for building design, construction and renovation—as well as our portfolio of positioning, modeling and visualization software—made it only natural for us to develop a Tango concept application that tracks and displays what is behind a wall,” said Bryn Fosburgh, vice president responsible for Trimble’s Construction Technology Divisions. “Since Tango devices are designed to be aware of their environment and location, they provide an excellent complement to our strategy of making construction more efficient and transparent.”

SketchUp Scan and Trimble Through The Wall are concept applications running on the Project Tango Tablet development kits. These development kits are provided by Google only to professional developers, providing a “sandbox” in which developers can experiment with various concept applications. The final functionality of Trimble’s concept applications are still under design. Additional information is available at:  http://www.trimble.com/ProjectTango.

National Assessment of Ecosystem Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Fluxes

www.usgs.gov

Data Access

View and download the primary data that has been developed by the USGS team in a variety of formats using the LandCarbon Data Tool. Visualize data products, view and interact with maps, charts, and statistics that summarize the results of the USGS assessment.

A detailed description of the viewer and how to use it can be found in the USGS LandCarbon Viewer Tutorial (YouTube).

denali_6904758951_a

NOAA, Partners Predict an Average ’Dead Zone’ for Gulf of Mexico; Slightly Above­ Average Hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay

www.usgs.gov

Scientists are expecting an average, but still large, hypoxic or “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico this year, and slightly above-average hypoxia in the Chesapeake Bay.

NOAA-supported modeling is forecasting this year’s Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone to cover an area ranging from about 4,633 to 5,708 square miles (12,000 to 14,785 square kilometers) or about the size of the state of Connecticut.

While close to averages since the late 1990s, these hypoxic zones are many times larger than what research has shown them to be prior to the significant human influences that greatly expanded their sizes and effects.

The Gulf of Mexico prediction is based on models developed by NOAA-sponsored modeling teams and individual researchers at the University of Michigan, Louisiana State University, Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences/College of William and Mary, Texas A&M University, and the U.S. Geological Survey,  and relies on nutrient loading estimates from the USGS. The models also account for the influence of variable weather and oceanographic conditions, and predict that these can affect the dead zone area by as much as 38 percent.

A second NOAA-funded forecast, for the Chesapeake Bay, predicts a slightly larger than average dead zone in the nation’s largest estuary. The forecast predicts a mid-summer low-oxygen hypoxic zone of 1.97 cubic miles, an early-summer oxygen-free anoxic zone of 0.51 cubic miles, with the late-summer oxygen-free anoxic area predicted to be 0.32 cubic miles. Because of the shallow nature of large areas of the estuary the focus is on water volume or cubic miles, instead of square mileage as used in the Gulf.

The Chesapeake Bay prediction is based on models developed by NOAA-sponsored researchers at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, University of Michigan, and again relies on nutrient loading estimates from USGS.

The dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico affects nationally important commercial and recreational fisheries and threatens the region’s economy. The Chesapeake Bay dead zones, which have been highly variable in recent years, threaten a multi-year effort to restore the water and habitat quality to enhance its production of crabs, oysters, and other important fisheries.

Hypoxic (very low oxygen) and anoxic (no oxygen) zones are caused by excessive nutrient pollution, primarily from human activities such as agriculture and wastewater, which results in insufficient oxygen to support most marine life and habitats in near-bottom waters. Aspects of weather, including wind speed, wind direction, precipitation and temperature, also affect the size of dead zones.

“We are making progress at reducing the pollution in our nation’s waters that leads to ‘dead zones,’ but there is more work to be done,” said Kathryn D. Sullivan, Ph.D., under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. “These ecological forecasts are good examples of the critical environmental intelligence products and tools that NOAA provides to interagency management bodies such as the Chesapeake Bay Program and Gulf Hypoxia Task Force.  With this information, we can work collectively on ways to reduce pollution and protect our marine environments for future generations.”

Later this year, researchers will measure oxygen levels in both bodies of water. The confirmed size of the 2014 Gulf hypoxic zone will be released in late July or early August, following a mid-July monitoring survey led by the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium. The final measurement in the Chesapeake will come in October following surveys by the Chesapeake Bay Program‘s partners from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality.

USGS nutrient-loading estimates for the Mississippi River and Chesapeake Bay are used in the hypoxia forecasts for the Gulf and Chesapeake Bay. The Chesapeake data are funded with a cooperative agreement between USGS and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. USGS also operates more than 65 real-time nitrate sensors in these two watersheds to track how nutrient conditions are changing over time.

For the Gulf of Mexico USGS estimates that 101,000 metric tons of nitrate flowed down the Mississippi River into the northern gulf in May 2014, which is less than the 182,000 metric tons in last May when stream flows were above average. In the Chesapeake Bay USGS estimates that 44,000 metric tons of nitrogen entered the bay from the Susquehanna and Potomac rivers between January and May of 2014, which is higher than the 36,600 metric tons delivered to the Bay during the same period in 2013.

“The USGS continues to conduct long-term nutrient monitoring and modeling” said William Werkheiser, USGS associate director for water. “This effort is key to tracking how nutrient conditions are changing in response to floods and droughts and nutrient management actions.”

The research programs supporting this work are authorized under the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act, known as HABHRCA, which was recently amended and reauthorized earlier this month through 2018.