New AAG Brochure About Geography Jobs

The new AAG Jobs and Careers in Geography brochure is geared toward recruiting both upper-level high school and undergraduate college students to geography courses, geography majors, and possible careers in geography.

The six-panel, color brochure is designed to speak directly to students, with lively graphics portraying young people engaged in the exciting and socially meaningful activities of geography today.

For more information and to download the form to order copies of the brochure, visit the Jobs and Careers page.

Darrel Hess Community College Geography Scholarship (Due Dec 31, 2014)

from www.aag.com

The AAG is pleased to announce a national scholarship program for community college students. Two $1,000 scholarships will be awarded to students from community colleges, junior colleges, city colleges, or similar two-year educational institutions who will be transferring as geography majors to four year colleges and universities. These scholarships are funded by Darrel Hess, coauthor of the textbook Physical Geography: A Landscape Appreciation by McKnight and Hess, published by Prentice Hall

The award consists of a scholarship to be used for any educational expenses in the amount of $1,000 and a formal certificate of merit. The formal announcement of the award will take place at the annual meeting of the AAG.

Eligibility: You are eligible to apply if you are a student currently enrolled at a US community college, junior college, city college, or similar two-year educational institution at the time you submit your application. You must also have completed at least two transfer courses in geography and plan to transfer to a four-year institution as a geography major during the coming academic year.

Criteria: Selection will be based on the overall quality of the application, scholastic excellence and academic promise. Financial need will also be considered. The selection committee will observe the purposes and preferences noted above when evaluating proposals. Two to four awards of $1,000 each will be made annually. Awards may not be made in years when funds are insufficient or proposals are not suitable.

Applications:

Applications consist of a an online application form, unofficial transcripts and two letters of reference.
Unofficial transcripts will be uploaded to the online application form.

Applicants should arrange for the submission of two Letters of Recommendation from college instructors sent as an email attachment from the instructor’s own email address to grantsawards [at] aag [dot] org . If sent as a hard copy, they must be submitted in sealed envelopes with the instructor’s signature across the flap, and mailed to AAG Hess Scholarship, Association of American Geographers, 1710 16th Street NW, Washington DC 20009.

Notification: Acknowledgement of receipt of application materials will be returned within a maximum of 2-3 business days. All applicants will be notified of the status of their submission within 6 months after the deadline. To receive their scholarships, awardees will be asked to submit official documentation of their admission to a 4-year institution along with verification of majoring in geography, such as an official transcript that lists major, or as a letter from the department chair.

Awardees are encouraged, but not required to attend the AAG Annual Meeting following their award to receive a certificate of recognition at the AAG Awards Luncheon.  Click for the entire article.

The Future of HealthTech – Ambulance Drones

Robert J. Szczerba in www.forbes.com  14 Dec 2014

In December 2013, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos caused quite a stir with the announcement of his company’s plans to offer 30-minute product deliveries via unmanned aerial vehicles (more commonly referred to as “drones”).  Drones have been deployed by the U.S. military since the 1970s, for purposes ranging from providing bird’s eye surveillance of troop movements and weapons facilities to launching attacks on terrorist organizations.

However, the same technology can also be used to help save lives.   Thankfully, a growing number of commercial, non-profit, and government scientists and laboratories are working towards that goal.

This past October the Netherlands’ Delft University of Technology announced that graduate student Alec Momont had developed a prototype drone that delivers a defibrillator to a heart attack victim.  To address the reality that the victim’s chance of survival decreases dramatically with each passing minute, this “ambulance drone” is guided by GPS to a mobile phone location within 4.6 square miles in under a minute.  Once there, the drone uses live streaming audio and video to allow emergency personnel to provide instructions on how to use the defibrillator correctly, and transmit the patient’s vital signs.  Widespread adoption of this kind of technology would be welcome news here in the U.S., where heart disease is the number one cause of death for men and women (about 1 in 4), claiming an estimated 600,000 lives each year.  Click here to read more.