Southern California’s Shrinking Salton Sea

Free Webcast:

Start Date:11/4/2015

Start Time:2:00 PM EST
Duration:60 minutes

Abstract:

The Imperial Irrigation District (IID) Water Conservation and Transfer Project includes a long-term transfer of up to 303,000 acre-feet of water annually from IID to the San Diego County Water Authority, and the Coachella Valley Water District. The Water Transfer Project, along with other factors affecting Salton Sea inflows and water balance, will result in accelerated exposure of the Salton Sea floor. As the Sea continues to recede, there is potential for windblown dust emissions from the exposed dry lakebed (the playa). A significant portion of this windblown dust is PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 micrometers or less). PM10 are approximately 1/7th the thickness of a human hair, are small enough to be inhaled, and represent a potential human health risk.

The Salton Sea Air Quality Program is focused on monitoring and mitigating dust emissions from exposed Salton Sea playa. Remote sensing is a key component of this program, and will be used to map playa surfaces, vegetative cover, and active dust source areas. Learn how satellite, aerial and UAV images all contribute to this effort and how they are being processed using Trimble eCognition image analysis software. The presentation will also discuss dust control pilot projects, such as Surface Roughening, and the remote sensing techniques used to inform design and evaluate dust control effectiveness.

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SERVICE LEARNING COURSE OPPORTUNITY AT NASA WALLOPS ISLAND

Open to Virginia’s community college students! SERVICE LEARNING COURSE OPPORTUNITY AT NASA WALLOPS ISLAND

GIS 295 – Topics in Service Learning in GIS is being offered in Spring Semester 2016.

HELP NASA INVESTIGATE SEA LEVEL RISE AND INVASIVE SPECIES

Thomas Nelson Community College is offering a three-credit Sea Level Rise Service Learning course. All expenses paid for course tuition and four days of fieldwork including travel, lodging, and food! Competitive application process, students from all disciplines are encouraged to apply.

Sponsored by Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC) and offered through the STEM Takes Flight Program in partnership with GeoTEd (http://www.geoted.org/), NASA Wallops Flight Facility and Thomas Nelson Community College.

This online course contains field work that will likely be completed over a weekend (Thursday-Sunday) in April 2016.

Learn how to use and operate an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) to collect data and other geospatial technologies.

See flyer posted by 313 for more details and the link to the application is https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9HXDL88!

Save the Date: Friday, November 20th

We are planning another map-off with GMU against GW to celebrate GIS Day.  It will be at GMU on Friday November 20th in the evening (not sure what time).  Once again, we will be looking for volunteers.  If you are planning to continue your education at GMU, this would be a great opportunity for you!

As soon as I have more information, I will post!

5 New Ways to View Transit

Continue reading 5 New Ways to View Transit

Bored? How about a Google map game?

Games beyond GeoGuesser!!
Top 10 Google Maps games of all times
By Aleks Buczkowski –  Geoawesomeness

Continue reading Bored? How about a Google map game?

This map shows how American cities are racially segregated

From Geoawesomeness Aleks Buczkowski Sept 2, 2015

At Geoawesomeness openness and tolerance are our key values. Our team members come from different continents, countries and cultures. And we are definitely proud of our diversity.
From a spatial perspective it is interesting to observe social geography of a diverse society like the one in the U.S. Although statistically the social inequality and segregation on a racial level is lower than ever before, the new interactive map created by Dustin Cable from University of Virginia shows that it’s for from being perfect.
The map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. In total 308,745,538 dots coming from 2010 U.S. Census. Blue dots are placed for people who identify themselves as white, green for black people, red for Asian, orange for Hispanic and brown for those who identify themselves as from another race, Native American, or multiracial.

Racial-dot-map-2--Geoawesomeness

Continue reading This map shows how American cities are racially segregated