Swarm Satellites Discover ‘Jet Stream’ in Earth’s Core

Earth Imaging Journal

DECEMBER 20, 2016
Swarm Satellites Discover ‘Jet Stream’ in Earth’s Core

Using data from the European Space Agency’s three Swarm satellites—which measure the different magnetic fields that stem from Earth’s core, mantle, crust, oceans, ionosphere and magnetosphere—scientists discovered a jet stream deep below Earth’s surface that’s increasing in speed.

“It’s the first time this jet stream has been seen, and not only that—we also understand why it’s there,” said Phil Livermore from the University of Leeds and lead author of the paper published in Nature Geoscience.

One of the discoveries is a pattern of “flux patches” in the northern hemisphere, mostly under Alaska and Siberia, which make it easy to see changes in Earth’s magnetic field.

Swarm reveals that these changes are actually a jet stream moving at more than 40 kilometers a year—three times faster than typical outer-core speeds and hundreds of thousands of times faster than Earth’s tectonic plates.

This jet stream flows along a boundary between two different regions in the core. When material in the liquid core moves towards this boundary from both sides, the converging liquid is squeezed out sideways, forming the jet.

Map In Seconds

If you’ve tried to visualize your data with a map, you know how time-consuming it can be.  With choropleth maps you often need specialized and complex tools just to get started.

It shouldn’t take so long or be so difficult, so we built MapInSeconds.com, which takes your data and generates a map – in seconds. The tool is free, there’s no sign-up required, and you can save the map as an image or a PowerPoint slide with the click of a button.  Click below for more!

http://www.darkhorseanalytics.com/blog/mapping-data-should-take-seconds-mapinseconds-com

 

 

 

Interactive Map: Drug Overdose in US

VIEW ORIGINAL RESEARCH:  http://drugabuse.com/featured/cause-of-death-interactive/

From Daily Mail:

Interactive map lays bare America’s devastating overdose epidemic: Analysis of 15 years of data reveals key ages, genders, regions, and drugs behind the crisis

  • Overdose deaths have increased 137% since 2000; more than 50,000 Americans fatally overdosed in 2015
  • This interactive map, using CDC statistics, puts the staggering epidemic into context
  •  It breaks down the statistics into gender, age group, drug preference, and region
  • The steepest increase in overdose deaths has been among those aged between 65 and 74 years old 

Prescription opioids and illicit drugs have become incredibly pervasive throughout the U.S., and things are only getting worse.

Overdose deaths have increased 137 percent since 2000.

In fact, new figures released today revealed more than 50,000 Americans died from drug overdoses last year – the highest figure ever.

Fentanyl, a painkiller, causes 44 deaths every day, making it the most dangerous drug in America.

An analysis of 15 years of data shows the steepest increase in overdose deaths has been among those aged between 65 and 74 years old – going from 16 deaths in 1999, to 680 deaths in 2014, a 4,150 percent increase.

This is likely to do with chronic pain and un-monitored prescription opioid refills, as well as those turning to cheaper on-the-street alternatives – like heroin – when they cannot afford pharmaceutical drugs.

Opioids – which are legal, controlled substances often prescribed by doctors – have caused a 200 percent increase in overdose deaths.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4018086/Interactive-map-lays-bare-America-s-devastating-overdose-epidemic-figures-drugs-kill-people-guns.html#ixzz4U2seOCFf
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The Next Generation: GIS as a Career Choice

From Library of Congress http://blogs.loc.gov/maps/2016/12/gis-day/?loclr=eamap

The Next Generation: GIS as a Career Choice

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The following is a guest post by Nina Feldman, a former intern with the Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress and the American Association of Geographers. Nina is currently a senior at George Washington University, majoring in Environmental Science and GIS (Geographic Information Systems). She spoke of her inspirations and why she became a geographer at the recent Library of Congress’ GIS Day celebration. While interning, Nina worked with the research papers and personal archive of Roger Tomlinson.

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For me, GIS was not a clear-cut choice, but more of a discovery process. As many of you know, GIS in its basic definition is a computer-based system that collects, analyzes, and distributes spatial data and information. However, to me it’s much more than that, it’s a collection of data that represents people’s lives, experiences and significance. Personally, I have always been a collector. Throughout my life, which isn’t really that long, I’m sure I had around 15 different collections. At age four, I started simple, with rocks that I found cool. At age nine, I moved to the more advanced Pokémon cards. At age 14, it was Russian nesting dolls with their exquisite patterns and colors. And finally, today, at age 20, it’s maps. Maps of places I’ve been, maps of places I want to go, maps that friends have given me from their own adventures and maps that I drew myself. At first, I just thought it was another phase of mine, I am a map collector now, soon I’ll move on to something else, or maybe even go back to rocks. But as I watched my wall of maps grow along with my desire to learn, I had a feeling that this wasn’t just a phase.

Continue reading The Next Generation: GIS as a Career Choice

Academic Success Center

Workshops

The SEAS Program (Strategies for Educational and Academic Success) offers in-person and online workshops on a wide variety of topics, from study skills to reading comprehension, note-taking to time management.

Our workshops are offered regularly throughout the semester, and we also present workshops to classes and student groups, upon request. Faculty, if you are interested in having us customize one of these workshops or develop something new for your classes, please contact Gwen McCrea at gmccrea@nvcc.edu / 703-575-4708.
for more information:  https://blogs.nvcc.edu/asc/workshops/