Tag Archives: Landsat images

Satellite Spies Africa’s Oldest Desert and Largest Game Park

ESA’s Sentinel-2A satellite captured this natural-color image of central western Namibia, which includes the Namib Naukluft Park as well as the world’s oldest desert.

ESA’s Sentinel-2A satellite captured this natural-color image of central western Namibia, which includes the Namib Naukluft Park as well as the world’s oldest desert. (Credit: Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data [2016], processed by ESA)

A colorful image of central western Namibia, taken on Jan. 28, 2016, by the European Space Agency (ESA) Sentinel-2A satellite, details the world’s oldest desert: the Namib. Also present is the Namib Naukluft National Park, the largest game park in Africa and the fourth largest in the world.A typical west coast desert, moisture enters as fog, from the Atlantic Ocean, rather than receiving actual rainfall. The fog enables life in this arid region for snakes, geckos and insects such as the fogstand beetle, which survives by collecting fog moisture on its bumpy back, as well as hyenas, gemsboks and jackals.

Winds carrying the fog also create the sand dunes, whose age is rendered by the burnt-orange color as a result of the sand being oxidized. Also visible along the top-left part of the image is the Kuiseb River bordered on one side by some of the tallest sand dunes in the world and on the other by barren rock. The river blocks the movement of the dunes, which are blown northward by the winds.

One Year Anniversary Landsat 8

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=83099&src=eoa-iotd

On February 11, 2013,  the Landsat 8 satellite rocketed into a sunny California morning onboard a powerful Atlas V and began its life in orbit. In the year since launch, scientists have been working to understand the information the satellite has been sending back. Some have been calibrating the data—checking it against ground observations and matching it to the rest of the 42-year-long Landsat record. At the same time, the broader science community has been learning to use the new data.

From the USGS EROS

Fantastic news – we have TIRS and OLI images!   LDCM is performing as planned and everything is on track for a May operational transition.  The Landsat 7 underflight is next week, followed by an ascent to the WRS2 orbit.  Continuous imaging begins in early April.  

 Go to this link to see the images – http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/news/first-images-feature.html

 Access free global Landsat imagery at glovis.usgs.gov