Category Archives: Faculty Development

NOVA Psychology Professor Awarded Fulbright to Hungary

NOVA professor Amy Coren arrived in Pécs, Hungary (about 100 miles southwest of Budapest) at the beginning of September to begin her Fulbright fellowship in teaching and research at the Institute of Psychology and the Faculty of Law at Hungary’s oldest university – the University of Pécs, founded in 1367.

Professor Coren is proud to be one of only five Americans from U.S. universities who were selected by the Fulbright Commission to teach and carry out research in Hungary for the 2017-2018 academic year. As a result of her unique qualifications (Ph.D. in Psychology, and J.D.), she has been engaged with both the faculty of law and the psychology department in teaching courses – an advanced undergraduate and M.A. level course in cross-cultural psychology, a seminar for Ph.D. students on the psychology of consciousness, and a lecture series in forensic psychology.

In addition to her teaching responsibility, Prof. Coren is also a thesis advisor for several undergraduate research projects spanning the fields of law and psychology (including one project examining the correlation between criminality and frontal lobe processing).

During her time in Hungary, Prof. Coren has attended several conferences on neuroscience (specifically the Regional European Neuroscience Conference, FENS), and will be delivering additional lectures to students and faculty interested in the US educational system.

At the end of October, she will be delivering a keynote address on the mental health challenges facing migrants at a conference sponsored by the University of Pécs Medical School and U.S. State Department. In addition to her ongoing teaching responsibilities, the rest of the semester spent in Hungary will involve collecting data for an international collaborative research project on positive youth development and continuing to lay the groundwork for exchange programs bringing Hungarian scholars and students to the US for academic exchanges.

The Fulbright Scholar Program is funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and offers over 500 teaching, research or combination teaching/research awards annually in over 125 countries. For more information on the Fulbright application process faculty can contact Stacey Bustillos (sbustillos@nvcc.edu) in the Office of International Education and Sponsored Programs for tips and guidance.

NOVA Fulbright Scholar to Receive Honorary Doctorate from Host Institution in Russia

Phillip Imel, associate accounting professor and a Fulbright Scholar who taught at Ural State University of Economics in Yekaterinburg, Russia, from September 2012 to June 2013, will be returning there to accept an honorary Doctor of Economics degree.

Professor Natalia Vlasova, the vice rector for international relations at the University, informed him of the honor. The decision to award the diploma was made by the University’s Academic Council. Imel and his wife will travel to the city of about 1.4 million residents in the Ural Mountains of central Russia, near Siberia, in June for the ceremony.

“Since my Fulbright experience, Russia has become my second home with Yekaterinburg and the Ural State University of Economics both holding a special place in my heart,” said Imel.

“We congratulate Phillip on this great honor, and thank him for all of his hard work and dedication,” said Celeste Dubeck-Smith, Annandale Business and Public Services Division dean.

Imel’s Fulbright project was titled “Comparative Analysis of the Russian and American Business Systems.” He taught three regular courses and several seminars at the university while performing research for a paper he presented at an international conference on global capital markets at the university.

He worked to introduce methods and techniques to the finance and accounting curricula at Ural State University to allow students to transfer their academic credentials to other countries. This came out of his experience meeting students at NOVA who were respected professionals in their home countries, but had to take remedial courses to qualify for positions in the U.S.

Imel and his wife also helped students planning to transfer to U.S. colleges prepare to take the ACT college readiness assessment test. He noted that Ural State University is more international than most Russian universities.

Imel attended Ashland Community College and Morehead State University in Kentucky and has done doctoral work at the University of Virginia. Prior to coming to NOVA, he taught at Southwest Virginia Community College where he had the opportunity to travel to Russia five times through a U.S. State Department exchange program with Russian universities.

In the process, he learned to speak Russian and says he fell in love with the country. “I enjoyed Yekaterinburg so much because it is near Siberia about a thousand miles from Moscow, and you are among the real true Russian people,” he said.

He added that it is much like the mountainous rural Kentucky where he grew up.

http://blogs.nvcc.edu/intercom/2015/02/16/phillip-imel-to-receive-honorary-doctorate-in-russia/

NOVA Fulbrights Highlighted in Chronicle for Higher Education article

Fulbright Program Seeks to Get More Community Colleges Involved in Exchanges

When someone mentions the Fulbright Program, it often evokes images of venerable researchers from elite institutions traveling to far-flung corners of the world. But the U.S. State Department is doing more to make sure that faculty members and others from community colleges also benefit from the exchange program, with the goal of getting more international perspectives into community-college campuses and classrooms.

Like those enrolled at four-year colleges, community-college students will be entering an increasingly globalized work force. But they often have fewer opportunities to study abroad because many of them work, have families, or face financial hardships. What’s more, while more international students are coming to community colleges in recent years, students from overseas tend to enroll at research institutions—meaning students at two-year institutions have far fewer opportunities to meet or share views with a foreign peer.

To help bridge that global-knowledge gap, the department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, which administers Fulbright, says it plans to step up efforts to promote opportunities to students, instructors, and administrators at two-year institutions. In emails, webinars, and presentations at community-college events, it’s pitching exchanges, like one that sends community-college administrators to Russia for two weeks to share ideas about vocational education.

The Fulbright Program, which is actually a collection of a dozen or sodifferent exchanges, is also promoting several that bring foreign scholars or language instructors to teach at community colleges, minority-serving institutions, and small liberal-arts colleges.

‘International Awareness’

Hosting foreign participants helps campuses enhance language instruction, while “sending faculty and administrators abroad provides them with the skills needed to jump-start campus internationalization and build long-term connections abroad,” Meghann Curtis, the department’s deputy assistant secretary of state for academic programs, wrote in an email to The Chronicle. The department says the focus on community colleges dovetails with the White House’s recent spotlight on the important role played by two-year institutions.

To be sure, top-tier universities will probably always produce the most scholars who win Fulbright awards to go abroad. Applicants generally need a Ph.D. to participate in the core U.S. Scholar program, but community-college instructors lacking doctorates can apply for grants through thestudent program, which requires only a bachelor’s degree.

Community colleges are working to make sure that instructors on their campuses are aware of such opportunities.

“We’re trying to get the word out that not all Fulbrights require Ph.D.’s and that community-college faculty can be just as competitive,” said Stacey Bustillos, a former Fulbright program officer who coordinates international programs for Northern Virginia Community College. Because their main focus is on teaching, “their experiences will have a direct impact in the classroom.”

Ms. Bustillos has posted notices and co-hosted events with the college’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, and has offered sessions at pedagogy workshops on how to apply for grants.

With 1,900 international students and a growing immigrant population in the region, Northern Virginia has jumped on the opportunity Fulbright provides to expand its global reach. Four faculty members have won grants to study abroad—in Russia, Bosnia, and South Korea—in the past few years, and the system’s six campuses have taken turns hosting scholars from China and India.

“We have 180 countries represented across our students, faculty, and staff, so bringing in outside perspectives and cultural sensitivities is extremely important,” Ms. Bustillos said.

Miguel B. Corrigan, an associate professor of business at Northern Virginia’s Loudoun campus, spent last year teaching entrepreneurship and related topics at a college in Saratov, Russia. Next year a scholar he linked up with there, whose academic interests include fighting corruption, will come to the Virginia college to teach public administration.

Among other participating institutions, Broward College, in Florida, has developed partnerships with campuses in Russia; Skyline College, in California, offers Tagalog classes taught by teaching assistants from the Philippines; and Davidson County Community College, in North Carolina, has Arabic and Russian instruction taught by native speakers.

“About 40 percent of our students will go directly into the work force, where globalization is becoming increasingly important,” said Wayne C. Wheeler, director of international programs and services for the American Association of Community Colleges. “Since study abroad isn’t a viable option for many of our students, the Fulbright Program is one way colleges can bring the world to their campuses.”

Katherine Mangan writes about community colleges, completion efforts, and job training, as well as other topics in daily news. Follow her on Twitter@KatherineMangan, or email her at katherine.mangan@chronicle.com.

When someone mentions the Fulbright Program, it often evokes images of venerable researchers from elite institutions traveling to far-flung corners of the world. But the U.S. State Department is doing more to make sure that faculty members and others from community colleges also benefit from the exchange program, with the goal of getting more international perspectives into community-college campuses and classrooms.

Like those enrolled at four-year colleges, community-college students will be entering an increasingly globalized work force. But they often have fewer opportunities to study abroad because many of them work, have families, or face financial hardships. What’s more, while more international students are coming to community colleges in recent years, students from overseas tend to enroll at research institutions—meaning students at two-year institutions have far fewer opportunities to meet or share views with a foreign peer.

To help bridge that global-knowledge gap, the department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, which administers Fulbright, says it plans to step up efforts to promote opportunities to students, instructors, and administrators at two-year institutions. In emails, webinars, and presentations at community-college events, it’s pitching exchanges, like one that sends community-college administrators to Russia for two weeks to share ideas about vocational education.

The Fulbright Program, which is actually a collection of a dozen or sodifferent exchanges, is also promoting several that bring foreign scholars or language instructors to teach at community colleges, minority-serving institutions, and small liberal-arts colleges.

‘International Awareness’

Hosting foreign participants helps campuses enhance language instruction, while “sending faculty and administrators abroad provides them with the skills needed to jump-start campus internationalization and build long-term connections abroad,” Meghann Curtis, the department’s deputy assistant secretary of state for academic programs, wrote in an email to The Chronicle. The department says the focus on community colleges dovetails with the White House’s recent spotlight on the important role played by two-year institutions.

To be sure, top-tier universities will probably always produce the most scholars who win Fulbright awards to go abroad. Applicants generally need a Ph.D. to participate in the core U.S. Scholar program, but community-college instructors lacking doctorates can apply for grants through thestudent program, which requires only a bachelor’s degree.

Community colleges are working to make sure that instructors on their campuses are aware of such opportunities.

“We’re trying to get the word out that not all Fulbrights require Ph.D.’s and that community-college faculty can be just as competitive,” said Stacey Bustillos, a former Fulbright program officer who coordinates international programs for Northern Virginia Community College. Because their main focus is on teaching, “their experiences will have a direct impact in the classroom.”

Ms. Bustillos has posted notices and co-hosted events with the college’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, and has offered sessions at pedagogy workshops on how to apply for grants.

With 1,900 international students and a growing immigrant population in the region, Northern Virginia has jumped on the opportunity Fulbright provides to expand its global reach. Four faculty members have won grants to study abroad—in Russia, Bosnia, and South Korea—in the past few years, and the system’s six campuses have taken turns hosting scholars from China and India.

“We have 180 countries represented across our students, faculty, and staff, so bringing in outside perspectives and cultural sensitivities is extremely important,” Ms. Bustillos said.

Miguel B. Corrigan, an associate professor of business at Northern Virginia’s Loudoun campus, spent last year teaching entrepreneurship and related topics at a college in Saratov, Russia. Next year a scholar he linked up with there, whose academic interests include fighting corruption, will come to the Virginia college to teach public administration.

Among other participating institutions, Broward College, in Florida, has developed partnerships with campuses in Russia; Skyline College, in California, offers Tagalog classes taught by teaching assistants from the Philippines; and Davidson County Community College, in North Carolina, has Arabic and Russian instruction taught by native speakers.

“About 40 percent of our students will go directly into the work force, where globalization is becoming increasingly important,” said Wayne C. Wheeler, director of international programs and services for the American Association of Community Colleges. “Since study abroad isn’t a viable option for many of our students, the Fulbright Program is one way colleges can bring the world to their campuses.”

Katherine Mangan writes about community colleges, completion efforts, and job training, as well as other topics in daily news. Follow her on Twitter@KatherineMangan, or email her at katherine.mangan@chronicle.com.

http://chronicle.com/article/Fulbright-Program-Seeks-to-Get/189977/

 

Apply for a Fulbright Scholar Award 2016/17

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The Fulbright Scholar Award Catalog has been released for teaching and research opportunities for the 2016/17 academic year.  The online application deadline is Monday, August 3rd, 2015 but it is advised to plan in advance particularly when letters of invitation from international institutions are required.

  • 560 total awards available
  • 173 do NOT require a PhD
  • Several awards mention community college faculty specifically

You can find more information on the application process and other resources here.

Some awards that may particularly interest community college faculty but not limited to;

#6103 Malaysia

#6181 Denmark

#6315 and #6316 Russia

#6433 India

#6438 Kyrgyz Republic

#6451 Barbados and Eastern Caribbean

#6503 Jamaica

#6076 Cambodia

#6107 Philippines

#6118 Vietnam

Many Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) awards world-wide

NOVA has been the leading community college awarded with the most Fulbright Scholars during 2012/13 and 2013/14 with several other faculty recently awarded for 2015/16.

CREP_Logo_jpeg

The Fulbright Scholar award is an individual application but NOVA’s Fulbright campus representative, Stacey Bustillos (sbustillos@nvcc.edu), is available to provide you with guidance in award selection strategies, tips for writing a competitive application and potential leads for international letters of invitation.

 

NOVA Hosts Dutch Delegation through VACIE

Visiting Delegations_2014 006
Top Row: Karen Bushaw-Newton, Agnes Malicka, Breana Bayraktar Bottom Row: Linda de Mol-Wissink, Coriene Snel, Fieke Visser Missing NOVA VACIE awardee: Shannon Nieves

 

On Wednesday, October 22nd, NOVA’s Office of Global Studies and Programs and CETL hosted a reception at the Ernst Cultural Center to welcome the visiting delegation of VACIE awardees from the Netherlands along with their NOVA faculty partners. The event was well attended by NOVA faculty and staff who also had the opportunity to learn about Dutch culture and the Dutch higher education system. This year four NOVA faculty and staff were awarded VACIEs out of a total of 11 awards granted by the VCCS.

Below is the list of the NOVA-VACIE awardees;

Karen Bushaw-Newton, Biology-AN

Breana Bayraktar, ESL- WO

Agnes Malicka, ESL-AL

Shannon Nieves, Pathways program, CS

The VACIE International Exchange program is an international faculty exchange program between Virginia community colleges and foreign institutions of higher education involving several countries. This year institutions from the Netherlands participated in the program. The program’s purpose is to foster the exchange of information regarding best practices in higher education, to sharpen the global perspectives of the participants, and to promote lasting international friendships and partnerships. NOVA awardees hosted their visiting faculty members in their homes for two weeks during October with a reciprocal two –week visit to take place in their partner’s home country in the spring.  If you are interested in applying for next year’s program will be announced via email in March 2015.